Tag Archives: what Brazilians buy

3 Ways Advertisers Can Effectively Reach Brazil’s Class C

According to Ibope Inteligência, consumption in Brazil will grow by 10% in 2013 to reach R$1.5 trillion (US$693 billion). While Class B will be responsible for more than half of this consumption (R$143 billion), Class C will account for 24%, more than Class A’s 22%.

And with 105 million people who are currently part of Class C, it makes sense for advertisers and agencies to pay attention to how this emergent class spends its money. A while back we highlighted some spending trends for Class C using 2012 data, but now we have identified some new trends based on more recent research. Based on this data, here are some suggestions for professionals in marketing, advertising and media.

Try retargeting via Facebook Exchange. Retargeting is a tactic used by e-commerce and e-travel companies. This story explains how it works. It could work well for Class C because according to e-bit, in the first half of 2013, 58% of first-time e-commerce shoppers in Brazil were from Class C. In addition, research firm Data Popular recently reported that Class C makes up 56% of Facebook users in Brazil, while Classes AB make up 24% of the social site’s users. As such, there’s a significant group of class C online buyers and it’s likely that these buyers are on Facebook, thus making retargeting a worthy tactic to explore.

Increase online campaigns aimed at reaching Class C. Online research firm Navegg reported recently that Brazil now has 105 million Internet users. The country gained 3 million Internet users between the end of the first quarter of 2013 and the end of the second quarter. Of those 3 million new Internet users, 61% were from Class C—nearly 2 million people.

Consider more campaigns on pay TV. According to Anatel, nearly 17 million homes in Brazil had pay TV as of August 2013. This translates to an audience of around 54 million people. According to Globosat, 27 million of the 54 million pay TV viewers in Brazil are from classes CD. In fact, while the number of Class AB pay TV subscribers grew by 69% between 2009 and 2013, the amount of class CD pay TV subscribers grew by 398% in that same period.

A Sample of What Class C Buys the Most
Besides knowing how to target Class C with media, it makes sense to understand which product categories are the most popular with segment. Recent studies suggest the following are among the hottest products for Class C:

To find out how we can help you reach Class C in Brazil with any form of media, please contact us.

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3 Reasons Why Brazil Has Become a Major Luxury Market

In 2011, Brazil’s luxury market grew by 4.7% in terms of designer clothing and footwear while sales of luxury accessories went up by 3.5% to reach US$294 million, according to research firm Euromonitor.

Overall, Brazil’s luxury market doubled its growth rates between 2008 and 2012. As such, the country’s luxury goods market is worth more than US$7 billion. Mexico is in second place—Euromonitor reports that its luxury market is worth US$1.5 billion.

The following factors are driving Brazil’s growth as a luxury market:

#1 Economic growth
Despite relatively weak economic growth of 1.5% in 2012, Brazil’s economy should grow by 4% per year from 2013 through 2016. In addition, a recent study from IPC Marketing Editora projects that Brazilian consumption will surpass 2.7 trillion reales in 2012, with household spending growing by 3.6%, more than double the growth of the country’s GDP this year.

#2 Many HNWIs
According to research firm Global Information, Brazil has the largest amount of high net worth individuals (HNWIs) in Latin America. In fact, the country ranks 11th in the world in terms of the amount of high net worth individuals. In addition, a recent report by McKinsey&Company estimates that 3 million Brazilians can afford luxury goods and that the country has 24 billionaires and 155,000 millionaires—and a third of the millionaires are under 35.

#3 Projected future growth
MCF Consultoria & Conhecimento, a retail and luxury consultancy firm based in Sao Paulo, estimates that Brazil’s luxury market will grow by 25% in 2012. In addition, Euromonitor forecasts that BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China) will account for 16% of global luxury sales by 2016, up from 11% in 2012.

To find out how we can help you reach Brazil, Latin America or U.S. Hispanics via a strategic campaign across all media, please contact us.

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Brazil best sellers

What Brazilian Consumers Want

Recently the Brazilian research firm Cetelem BGN released its annual Observador report, based on interviews with consumers in 70 cities throughout the country. We went through the 100-page report to give advertisers, marketers and media professionals a breakdown of the key findings.

Classe C Still Surging
Brazil’s economic transformation in recent years has been dramatic. In 2005, 51% of the population was made up of people from classes D and E, while 34% were from the classe C middle class and 15% were from the upper AB classes. Yet in 2011, the middle class became the majority in Brazil, 54% of the population. These days, 103 million middle class or classe C Brazilians are now the dominant consumer segment.

Purchase Intent
When asked what they definitely intend to buy in the coming months, the top categories among Brazilians were furniture (31%), appliances (30%), travel (25%), TV/video products (19%), cell phones (17%) and computers (16%). Classes AB—42 million people—showed the strongest intent to spend money on travel, furniture and appliances.

Internet Access
Cetelem BGN’s results show that Internet penetration in Brazil is 44%, a figure in line with that of comScore, which estimates that 85 million Brazilians out of a total population of around 193 million have Internet access. At 43%, classe C’s Internet penetration rate is almost the same at the rate for the entire country.

E-commerce
More and more Brazilians are using the Internet to research products before buying and they do this most often when buying electronics, travel products and cultural products. Overall, 23% of Brazilians report that they buy products online, which means that 44 million people in Brazil engage in e-commerce. The two main promotional features that Brazil’s online shoppers value the most are promotional discount periods (66%) and free shipping (48%).
Most Brazilian Internet shoppers (81%) use credit cards while 46% use boletos bancários (online payment voucher) and 11% use crediário, a type of credit system based on installment payments.

Credit Cards
According to O Observador 2012, 33% of Brazilians own a credit card and 35% have debit cards, while 18% have store credit cards. Even among the AB classes of Brazil, the Observador survey shows credit card penetration to be 57%. Among Brazilian credit card owners nearly half (47%) own one and 31% own two, with only 3% owning 5 or more. For most items in Brazil, such as food, clothes, household bills, cell phones, gas, medicines and entertainment, cash is by far the preferred payment method.

To find out how we can help you reach Brazil, Latin America or U.S. Hispanics via a strategic campaign across all media, please contact us.

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Brazil best sellers

Brazil’s Best Sellers

Despite conservative macroeconomic projections, it seems like Brazilians are shopping more than ever. A study from the firm IPC Marketing Editora projects that consumption in Brazil will surpass US$2.7 trillion in 2012, with household spending exceeding GDP. Classes B and C account for half of what is consumed in Brazil, though Class B seems to show the strongest purchasing power.

We’ve observed some strong spikes in sales of a number of products in Brazil. Here’s a look at what grew the most in sales in 2011 and what’s selling strongly so far in 2012.

Autos
Car sales in Brazil grew by 2.9% in 2011, according to the Associação Nacional dos Fabricantes de Veículos Automotores (National Association of Automakers). The Volkswagen Gol was the biggest selling model in Brazil in 2011, followed by the Fiat Uno. Chevrolet’s Celta and Corsa Sedan ranked #3 and #4, respectively, in sales. Overall, Fiat sold the most cars in Brazil in 2011: 273,000. In 2012, the Federação Nacional da Distribuição de Veículos de Veículos Automotores (National Federation of Motor Vehicle Distribution), predicts car sales will go up 4.5% in Brazil.   

Computers
Research firm IDC reported recently that computer sales in Brazil went up by 12% in 2011 to reach 15.4 million units sold. According to the Getulio Vargas Foundation (FGV), a Brazilian higher education and research institution, sales of computers in Brazil will reach 17.9 million in 2012, an increase of 16%. FGV’s study indicates that currently there are 99 million computers in Brazil, roughly one computer for every two Brazilians. According to Fernando Meirelles, who led the research team from FGV, by 2017 there will be one computer for every Brazilian.
Notebooks and tablets are among the hottest types of computers among Brazilian consumers. Sales of notebooks grew by 60% in 2011 to reach 5 million, according to Gfk Consumer Choices, with 800,000 units sold in December 2011 alone.
Tablets posted comparatively modest sales of 450,000 units in 2011, but research firm Navegg predicts that Brazilians will buy 1 million tablets in 2012.

Cosmetics
Brazil’s cosmetics industry logged US$14 billion in ex-factory sales in 2011, 7.9% higher than in 2010, according to Associação Brasileira da Indústria de Higiene Pessoal, Perfumaria e Cosméticos. According to projections from Euromonitor International, in 2013 Brazil will overtake Japan to become the #2 cosmetics market in the world, just behind the United States.

E-commerce
The most recent report from market research firm e-bit indicated that in 2011, the e-commerce market in Brazil reached US$10.1 billion in sales, up 26% compared to 2010, when e-commerce sales totaled US$8 billion. In 2012, e-commerce sales in Brazil should reach US$12.6 billion, 25% higher than 2011, projects e-bit. Over 9 million new customers bought a product online for the first time in 2011, and overall around 32 million Brazilians have engaged in e-commerce. Top products for Brazilians who shop online include appliances, computers, electronics, health/beauty items and clothes/accessories.

Mobile Broadband Connections
According to Anatel, the country’s national telecommunications agency, there are now 54.3 million mobile broadband connections in Brazil, which means an overall 28% mobile broadband penetration rate. Forecasts from Teleco—an organization that tracks telecommunications in the country—suggest that Brazil will have 73 million mobile broadband connections by the end of 2012 and 124 million connections by 2014 when it hosts the World Cup. As mobile broadband connections have grown, so have the number of mobile phones with 3G services: currently 20% of the cell phones in Brazil have 3G.

Pharmaceuticals
According to IBOPE, sales of pharmaceuticals in Brazil will grow by 13% in 2012 and be four times more than the Gross Domestic Product. Classes B and C will account for 80% of the sales, spending 23 billion and 27 billion reales, respectively. A number of companies are benefiting from this surge, including Bayer HealthCare and Pfizer, which experienced increases of 13% and 14%, respectively, in their 2011 Brazil sales.

Smartphones
According to a projection by IDC, smartphone sales in Brazil will increase by 73% in 2012. In total numbers, this means that Brazilian shoppers will buy 15 million smartphones this year, whereas in 2011 they bought 8.9 million. This is a huge increase compared to 2010, when 4.8 million smartphones were sold in Brazil. IDC considers phones with operating systems, like iPhones or Blackberrys, to be smartphones. According to the firm, over 50% of the smartphones in Brazil use the Android operating system.

Videogame Consoles
According to market research firm GfK Consumer Choices, sales of video game consoles in Brazil shot up by 53% in 2011 to reach 935,000 units, up from 642,000 units in 2010.

To find out how we can help you reach Brazil, Latin America or U.S. Hispanics via a strategic campaign across all media, please contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.

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Brazil Has the #6 Economy in the World

The day after Christmas 2011, Brazil received an unexpected present: the Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR) proclaimed it the world’s sixth largest economy.
With this ranking, Brazil moved ahead of the United Kingdom but still trails France, the United States and other economic superpowers. Part of the drive forward is due to the economy’s 7.5% growth in 2010 and 3.5% growth in 2011.
For marketing, advertising and media professionals, Brazil’s economic growth has meant more consumers and an ever-expanding media market. Here’s a quick-reference look at the impact of more money on media in Brazil:

Pay TV. In late 2011 Brazil had more than 12.2 million households subscribing to pay TV. But this medium is no longer a luxury restricted to the upper AB classes: pay TV now has 31% penetration in Brazil’s surging Class C. And class C isn’t signing up just for TV: an Ipsos survey in 2011 showed that 33% of new combo packages (TV, Internet and phone) were sold to members of class C.

Internet. Two different projections say that 70-80% of Brazilians households will have Internet access by 2015. As of 2011 there were 67 million households in Brazil, which means at least 46.9 million households will have Internet access. The average household in Brazil has 3 people, meaning that Brazil could go from 78 million Internet users in 2011 to 140 million in just 4 years.

Print. Newspaper circulation in Brazil went up 4% between the first 6 months of 2010 and the same period in 2011 to hit 4.4 million, a new record. Brazil’s magazines set another record in 2011 by taking in nearly $1.3 billion in revenues.

Not all of the final tallies for Brazilian media numbers for 2011 are in yet, but it’s clear that that trend is headed upwards for the near future.

To find out how we can help you reach Brazil with a targeted media campaign, please contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.
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How to Reach Brazilians with Media

Not long ago we covered what Brazilians buy, breaking down over 20 recent studies. The next piece of the puzzle is how they use media and what they prefer. The following insights may help marketers, advertising agencies and media professionals create strategies to reach this powerfully growing market.



BLOGS & SOCIAL MEDIA

  • 71% of Brazilians visit blogs*
  • Top topics for Brazilian blogs include entertainment (24%), technology (20%) and education (10%)**
  • The top 3 brands mentioned on Brazilian blogs are Google, Samsung and Apple—these 3 account for 35% of the brand mentions**
  • The remaining 65% of brand mentions on Brazilian blogs include Adidas, Disney, Intel, Microsoft, Sony, Nokia, Amazon, Adobe, Motorola and Blackberry**
  • 79% of Brazilian Internet users are on social networks and their average age is 32**
  • Brazilians spend more time on social media outlets—19% of their overall time online—than people in any other country: in comparison, Americans dedicate 15% of their total time online to social media***
  • Facebook has surpassed Orkut in Brazil: as of August 2011, Facebook had 30.9 million unique users in Brazil compared to 29 million users for Orkut****
  • 61% of Brazilians use social media to find product recommendations and user reviews*****
  • Four out of 10 Brazilian users of social media are fans of products; out of those, 81% are looking at new products from the brands they are fans of*****

*Source: Ipsos
** Source: Boobox
***Source: Experian Hitwise
**** Source: Ibope Nielsen Online
***** Source: Oh!Panel

INTERNET

  • 77.8 million: the total number of Brazilians with Internet access as of the second quarter of 2011*
  • 58 million: the number of Brazilians in households that have computers with Internet access, a 20% increase from 2010*
  • 31.1 million Brazilians visit e-commerce sites every month*
  • Coupon sites in Brazil grew 379% in visitors between May 2010 and May 2011*
  • 60% of class AB Brazilians access the Internet via mobile phones*
  • 36% of class C Brazilians access the Internet via mobile phones*
  • 75% of the page views in Brazil are generated by just 7 Web sites: AOL, Earth, iG, Globo.com, Google (including search, YouTube and Orkut), Microsoft Live and Yahoo**
  • 68% of Brazilian Internet users say that online ads influence their purchasing decisions, more than TV (66%)***
  • 79% of Brazilian Internet users search for products after being impacted by offline media****
  • Top offline media that drive Brazilians to research products online include TV (51%), print (35%) and Out of Home (27%)****
  • The online content about products that Brazilians look for the most are discounts (40%) and product/service information (33%)****
  • Groupon and Peixe Urbano are the top group-buying sites in Brazil*
  • In 2011, Brazilians spent $2 billion on playing online games, with 16% spent on MMO (massively multiplayer online) gaming sites, 15% spent on other types of gaming sites, 11% on social media sites like Orkut and Facebook and 9% on mobile phone games*****

*Source: IBOPE Nielsen Online
**Source: JWT
***Source: Deloitte Media Democracy
****Source: Iprospect and Google Brazil
*****Source: Newzoo



PRINT

  • 73% of Brazilians prefer to get their news from print media rather than online*
  • 21 million Brazilians—11% of the total population—read the newspaper every day*
  • Brazilian magazines grew 5% in circulation between July 2010 and July 2011**
  • Average daily newspaper circulation in Brazil hit a new record in the first 6 months of 2011: 4.4 million copies**
  • Subscriptions to print magazines in Brazil have doubled since 2010***
  • Subscriptions to newspapers in Brazil have increased by 7% since 2010***
  • Online newspaper subscriptions in Brazil increased to 14% between 2009 and 2010***
  • In 2010 Brazil’s magazine titles grew by 2.6% to 4,000, while both circulation and ad revenues for the 100 largest titles grew by 4.5%***
  • Overall, Brazilian magazines will take in $1.269 billion in revenues in 2011, a new record****

*Source: Datafolha
**Source: Instituto Verificador de Circulação
***Source: Deloitte
****Source: Group M


TV

  • 175 million Brazilians (92% of the population) watch TV regularly*
  • 75 million Brazilians (49% of the population) watch TV 3 or more hours a day*
  • Of the 75 million Brazilians who watch 3 hours or more of TV every day, 44.8% are women*
  • 90% of Brazilians say TV is their preferred source for news**
  • Pay TV subscriptions in Brazil grew by 11% in the first five months of 2011, with 1.1 million new subscribers added in that time frame***
  • Pay TV had a penetration rate of 33% among Brazil’s Class C as of mid-2011****
  • Among young Brazilians aged 12-19, TV is the primary source for news (68%), compared to just 20% for Internet and radio (4%)*****
  • 72% of Brazilians get their sports news from TV******

*Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística
**Source: Datafolha
***Source: Anatel
****Source: Ipsos
*****Source: TNS Research International
******Source: IBOPE Media

To find out how you can reach Brazil’s high-powered consumer market, contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.

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Ad Spending Will Grow Strongly in Latin America in 2012

Magnaglobal recently released its global ad forecast for 2012 and revealed some interesting figures for 2011. Here’s a look at the relevant numbers for all of Latin America and some specific countries, including 2012 projections for different media types.

2011

  • Latin America’s ad revenues grew by 13.2% in 2011, the biggest growth among developing economies around the world
  • Argentina’s ad revenues grew by 37.9% in 2011, the largest growth of all 63 countries analyzed by Magnaglobal
  • Brazil continued to show strong growth this year, with a 10.2% increase in ad revenue
  • Globally, TV ad revenues grew 4.8% and the medium was #1 in ad revenue across all media, with a 41% share
  • Internet was the biggest global grower in ad revenues in 2011, up by 16.9%
  • Paid search is back on top as the largest revenue driver for online advertising, growing by 19% to total $14.9 billion, with display ads growing by 15% and online video spiking by 58% to pull in $4.7 billion in revenues
  • Radio grew by 2.2% globally, while magazine revenues were down by 0.9% and newspaper revenues dropped by 2.4%
  • OOH revenues grew by 6.4% globally

2012

  • Magnaglobal projects that global ad revenues will grow by 5% in 2012
  • Latin America will post 13% ad revenue growth in 2012, leading all emerging economies in the world
  • Argentina will see the biggest ad revenue growth in all of Latin America in 2012, with 26.4%, outstripping all BRIC countries
  • Brazil will post 12% growth in ad revenues in 2012 and will rank #7 in the world in ad spend, ahead of Canada, Australia and Italy and just behind France
  • Globally, in 2012 Internet will surpass newspapers as the second biggest media category (behind TV), accounting for almost 20% of overall ad spend
  • Radio will grow globally by 1.6% in ad revenues
  • Newspapers (-1.0%) and magazines (-1.3%) will continue to drop
  • OOH will grow by another 6.3% in 2012

To find out how we can help you reach Latin America with a precisely targeted campaign, please contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.

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social-media

Brands Should Be Careful with Social Media in Latam

We’ve seen that social media can be a brand booster in Latin America. However, a new survey of 72,000 consumers shows they have mixed feelings about the social media presence of brands.
TNS carried out the study, called Digital Life, which surveyed customers in 60 countries—including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru—about their online habits, including social media. Here’s a rundown of the key results.

The Good
• 43% of Latin American social media users see social sites as a place to buy products, with 48% of Brazilians sharing this view
• 44% of Argentines say social media sites are a good place to learn about products
• Several Latam countries are more open to brands on social media sites than they are resistant, including Brazil (32%), Colombia (31%), Peru (32%), Mexico (20%) and Chile (18%)
• 46% of Latin Americans talk about brands online, including 25% of Argentines
• 55% of Latin Americans say they’re driven to get involved with a brand online by promotions or special offers

The Bad
• 45% of Latin Americans don’t want brands to market to them via social media—they see the brands as invading their social space
• 53% of Brazilians don’t want brands to market to them via social media
• 44% of Argentines don’t want brands to market to them via social media
• 37% of Mexicans don’t want brands to market to them via social media
• More Argentines go online to complain about brands (13%) than praise them (11%)

The Confusing
The numbers paint a jumbled picture. On one hand, almost half of Argentines think that social media sites are a good place to learn about products. Yet the same amount doesn’t want brands to market to them on social media. About half of Brazilians see social sites as a place to buy products, but the other half doesn’t want to be bothered by brands on social media sites. A good number of Latin Americans seem open to special offers from products, yet others don’t.
To further muddle things, in the press release that TNS put out to discuss Digital Life’s results, the company said that “misguided digital strategies are generating mountains of digital waste, from friendless Facebook accounts to blogs no one reads…The result is huge volumes of noise, which is polluting the digital world and making it harder for brands to be heard—presenting a major challenge for businesses trying to enter into dialogue with consumers online.”
Okay—but this doesn’t really explain things. Clearly, many of the respondents in these countries are fine with brands reaching out to them social media. And none of the preliminary numbers suggest that consumers perceive social media efforts from brands to be digital garbage.

Moving Forward
What is clear is that Latin Americans—and other consumers—are ambivalent about brands reaching them via social media. In addition, companies risk being perceived as invading their customers’ social media space. But does this mean that brands are “polluting” the digital world with their social media efforts? Not necessarily.

What is does mean is that brands need to look very hard at their social media efforts in Latin America. This is a divided audience—half are glad to see you there and half are not. So the question is: how do you win over the other half? Obviously, the answer will be different for every company. To find those answers, brands may want to explore case studies of successful social media use to see what kind of best practices they can glean and apply. They should also do research in these markets to determine how social media users see their efforts and refine them accordingly. Overall, the survey results point to a need for brands to constantly monitor and improve their social media efforts to make sure that they’re having a friendly dialogue—not an annoying, alienating monologue—with their customers.

To learn more about how we can help you reach Latin America with a customized campaign, contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.

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