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How Top Companies are Using Social Media in Latam

It’s clear that social media are hugely popular in Latin America and reach more than 90% of the region’s 232 million Internet users. Given this, how are companies in Latin America using social media to further their marketing efforts? A new study from Burson-Marstellar analyzed these efforts by looking at the social media strategies of the top 25 companies in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, Uruguay and Venezuela.

We’ve grouped together some of the key takeaways of the study for marketing, media and advertising professionals.

65% ARE USING AT LEAST ONE SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORM
This is an improvement from 2010, when only 49% of the Latin American companies were using social media. However, Latam firms are clearly behind the rest of the world in this regard: globally, 87% of companies are using at least one social media platform.

BRAZILIAN AND VENEZUELAN COMPANIES LEAD THE REGION IN SOCIAL MEDIA USE
In 2012, 88% of the Brazilian companies and 84% of the Venezuelan companies analyzed by the Burson-Marstellar study were using social media platforms. Other countries in which a large percentage of top firms report using social media include Colombia (76%), Mexico (76%), Chile (76%) and Argentina (64%). The lowest percentage was found in companies in Puerto Rico, where only 28% of top firms use social media. However, only 5% of companies in Puerto Rico were using social media in 2010, so the rate quintupled in just two years, obviously indicating growth in this area. 

FACEBOOK AND TWITTER ARE THE PLATFORMS OF CHOICE
In 2012, 50% of the firms studied were using Facebook and 53% were using Twitter. In third place was YouTube (31%), with Google+ in fourth place (20%). This data is interesting when you consider that comScore results indicate that Google+ is not among the top social media sites in Latin America’s largest markets. For example, in November 2012, the top social media sites in Brazil in descending order were Facebook, Orkut, LinkedIn, Twitter, Ask.fm, Tumblr, Scribd, Badoo, Deviantart and Vostu. With the exceptions of Orkut and Vostu, these are the top social sites in Argentina, Mexico and Colombia.
Of course, the issue could be about fit. LinkedIn is for professional contacts, Badoo doesn’t accept advertising and is focused on meeting people, Deviantart is about posting artwork, Scribd is a document sharing site and Ask.fm is a Q&A site.
That said, Latin American firms may want to consider Pinterest, a site that many American firms are including in their social media mix. Pinterest is gaining ground in all of these markets and has cracked the list of the top 20 social media sites in Latin America, though not the top 10—yet.

COMPANIES IN BRAZIL AND MEXICO HAVE THE MOST TWITTER FOLLOWERS
Compared to 2010, companies in Brazil and Mexico have skyrocketed in followers. For example, Brazilian firms had an average of 4,206 social media followers per account in 2010 and in 2012 this figure reached 66,958; in Mexico, the average went from 2,240 social media followers to 43,107. That said, companies in other countries have also seen huge increases in the amount of followers per account:

  • Argentina: from 777 in 2010 to 19,023 in 2012
  • Chile: from 1,624 in 2010 to 13,000 in 2012
  • Colombia: from 525 in 2010 to 8,496 in 2012
  • Peru: from 85 in 2010 to 4,814 in 2012

In all of Latin America, the average amount of social media followers of these top 25 firms went from 2,626 to 33,077.

THE PERCENTAGE OF COMPANIES WITH FACEBOOK PAGES SPIKES IN ARGENTINA, BRAZIL, PERU AND PUERTO RICO

In these countries, the percentage either doubled or nearly doubled: up by 48% in Argentina, by 52% in Brazil, by 60% in Chile and by 52% in Peru. However, the firms in Colombia showed the most impressive growth. The amount of firms in Colombia with Facebook pages went up by 76% between 2010 and 2012.

BRAZILIANS TALK THE MOST ABOUT COMPANY FACEBOOK PAGES
An average of nearly 45,000 Brazilians are talking about company Facebook pages, much more than in any other country.  No other country in Latin America even comes close to this massive level of engagement. The country that occupies second place in the amount of people discussing company Facebook pages is Peru, with just 7,781 doing so.

30% OF LATIN AMERICA’S TOP FIRMS ARE SHARING CONTENT ON YOUTUBE
Mexico has the highest percentage of firms that share content on YouTube at 52%, followed by firms in Chile and Brazil (each with 48%) and Argentina (32%). These figures are somewhat surprising given that Latin Americans are watching online videos more than ever.

THE MAJORITY OF LARGE COMPANIES IN LATIN AMERICA ARE NOT USING GOOGLE+
Currently 20% have a Google Plus page, compared to the global average of 48%.

To explore how we can help you reach Latin Americans via social media or any other type of media, please contact us.

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Latin America’s Media Landscape 2015-2017

Predicting the future is always tricky, but different industry associations have made forecasts for different forms of media in Latin America for the next few years, all based on current trends. Using this data, here’s what experts say that Latin America’s media market will look like in the near future.

#1 THERE WILL BE 359 MILLION INTERNET USERS IN LATIN AMERICA BY 2015
Currently the population of Latin America is at around 575 million but according to the Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), by 2015 Latin America will have 598 million people. (This count includes Puerto Rico, projected to have 4.1 million people by 2015, but excludes non-Spanish-speaking countries like Haiti and French Guyana.)
According to a May 2012 projection from Registro de Direcciones de Internet para América Latina y Caribe (LACNIC), by 2015 Internet penetration will reach 60% in Latin America. Since 60% of 598 million is 359 million, it appears that Latin America will add 127 million Internet users over the next 3 years to its current total of 232 million Internet users.

Not surprisingly, the growth will be driven by the powerhouse Internet markets. Brazil’s Comitê Gestor da Internet estimates that 80% of Brazil’s homes will have Internet access by 2015. Given Brazil’s population of 193 million and an average of 3.3 people per household, this means that by 2015 Brazil could have 154 million Internet users—up considerably from the 85 million it has today per comScore. LACNIC also predicts that Mexico will have 65 million Internet users by 2015, up hugely from its current total of 40.6 million. Other markets predicted to gain lots of new users include Chile (16.4 million Internet users by 2015) and Ecuador (7.5 million Internet users by 2015).

#2 PAY TV PENETRATION IN LATIN AMERICA WILL REACH 68% BY 2017
According to Dataxis, by 2017 pay TV penetration in the 7 biggest Latin American markets will reach 68% and offer advertisers and audience of 97 million people. The biggest growth markets for pay TV will be Brazil, Mexico, Colombia and Argentina. In addition, the head of Brazil’s national telecommunications agency (Anatel) recently said that 90% of Brazilian homes could have pay TV by 2018. For its part, Mexico could have more than 50% of pay TV penetration by 2015.

#3 LATIN AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS WILL GROW BY 5.5% PER YEAR THROUGH 2016
The downturn experienced by newspapers around the world does not seem to be affecting Latin America. According to a recent projection from PricewaterhouseCoopers, revenues for Latin American newspapers will grow annually by 5.5% through 2016 to reach US$10.4 billion.

#4 LATAM WILL HAVE 750 MOBILE CONNECTIONS BY 2015 PLUS MAJOR MOBILE DEVICE PENETRATION
According to the GSMA, Latin America will have 750 million mobile connections by 2015. Overall mobile penetration in the region is above 100%. Brazil’s mobile penetration is at well over 100%, as is Argentina’s, but in October 2012 Brazil reached a total of 258 million active mobile lines, up from 232 million just a few months back. Mexico is slated to reach 94% mobile penetration by the end of 2012 and over 100% by the first quarter of 2013.
Beyond simple penetration, mobile is changing Latin American markets through the adoption of mobile devices. It’s really not a question of whether a brand needs a mobile ad strategy for Latin America—it’s what this mobile ad strategy will be. Just look at the numbers:

To find out how we can help you reach Latin America via a strategic campaign across all media, please contact us.

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Brazil luxury final

3 Reasons Why Brazil Has Become a Major Luxury Market

In 2011, Brazil’s luxury market grew by 4.7% in terms of designer clothing and footwear while sales of luxury accessories went up by 3.5% to reach US$294 million, according to research firm Euromonitor.

Overall, Brazil’s luxury market doubled its growth rates between 2008 and 2012. As such, the country’s luxury goods market is worth more than US$7 billion. Mexico is in second place—Euromonitor reports that its luxury market is worth US$1.5 billion.

The following factors are driving Brazil’s growth as a luxury market:

#1 Economic growth
Despite relatively weak economic growth of 1.5% in 2012, Brazil’s economy should grow by 4% per year from 2013 through 2016. In addition, a recent study from IPC Marketing Editora projects that Brazilian consumption will surpass 2.7 trillion reales in 2012, with household spending growing by 3.6%, more than double the growth of the country’s GDP this year.

#2 Many HNWIs
According to research firm Global Information, Brazil has the largest amount of high net worth individuals (HNWIs) in Latin America. In fact, the country ranks 11th in the world in terms of the amount of high net worth individuals. In addition, a recent report by McKinsey&Company estimates that 3 million Brazilians can afford luxury goods and that the country has 24 billionaires and 155,000 millionaires—and a third of the millionaires are under 35.

#3 Projected future growth
MCF Consultoria & Conhecimento, a retail and luxury consultancy firm based in Sao Paulo, estimates that Brazil’s luxury market will grow by 25% in 2012. In addition, Euromonitor forecasts that BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China) will account for 16% of global luxury sales by 2016, up from 11% in 2012.

To find out how we can help you reach Brazil, Latin America or U.S. Hispanics via a strategic campaign across all media, please contact us.

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brazil magazines

Magazines Surge in Popularity in Brazil

The most recent edition of Estudos Marplan EGM Next Gen show that print media continue to do well in Brazil. Between 2011 and the first quarter of 2012, magazines’ media penetration rose from 39% to 45%. This was the biggest gain of all forms of media. In second place was pay TV, which went from 35% to 40% penetration. Other forms of media in Brazil that gained in penetration in 2012 were newspapers (from 46% to 47%) and Internet (49% to 51%). Free TV’s penetration remained constant at 97%, while radio’s penetration dropped slightly from 77% to 74%.

In terms of socioeconomic groups, magazines increased their penetration significantly with classes AB, going from 52% in 2011 to 63% this year. In addition, magazines also gained penetration with class C: 38% in 2012 compared to 31% in 2011.

Beyond penetration, Estudos Marplan also highlighted how Brazilians use the different types of media. They use TV and newspapers primarily to get news, learn about general culture and spend their free time. Brazilians report that they use Internet and magazines to stay current with the news and for shopping information. Pay TV and radio are seen as companion media by Brazilians, and also as vehicles to cultural and sports information.

To find out how we can help you reach Brazilians via any form of media, please contact us.

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Targeting Mexico’s Internet Users

Recently comScore released its newest study of Mexico’s Internet users, entitled Futuro Digital—México 2012. We analyzed it to break out key takeaways to help digital marketers, advertisers and media professionals target this huge audience of Internet users even more effectively.

Skewing Younger
Nearly 38% of Mexico’s Internet users are between 15 and 24, with another 24.6% being 25-34. Nearly 20% of Mexican Internet users are 35-44. In addition, of all the time spent online by Mexico’s Internet users, nearly half (44.6%) is spent by users aged 15-24. As such, products that skew young—such as tech devices, games, energy drinks, movies and more—are a good fit for an online campaign in Mexico.

Hot Categories
Certain kinds of sites are more likely to draw Mexican Internet users than others. Here’s a look at the top types in terms of reach.

• News sites: 97% reach in Mexico, 80% globally
• Multimedia sites: 96% reach in Mexico, 78% reach globally
• Community sites: 92% reach in Mexico, 72% globally
• Blogs: 82% reach in Mexico, 58% globally
• Games: 72% reach in Mexico, 58% globally

Social Media
Mexico ranks among the top 5 countries in the world in terms of time spent on social media. Each social site visitor in Mexico spends an average of 8.3 hours per month on social media. The only Latin Americans more engaged with social media than Mexicans are Argentines, who average 10.4 hours per month per user on social sites.
Facebook draws the most Mexican Internet users. It has 90% penetration in Mexico and grew by 25% in visitors between June 2011 and June 2012. While other social sites don’t draw nearly the same amount of visitors as Facebook, a number are growing well in Mexico. Between June 2011 and June 2012, LinkedIn grew by 399% in Mexico, Tumblr grew by 277%, Scribd by 74%, Deviant Art by 50% and Twitter by 46%. Both Badoo and Sonico posted significant drops in the same period: 44% and 45%, respectively, as did MySpace, which drop by 13% in visitors.

Entertainment
This site category has 97.5% reach in Mexico and Mexican Internet users spend 3.8 hours per month on entertainment sites, higher than any other Latin Americans except for Peruvians. Multimedia is the subcategory within Entertainment that has the most reach, although music sites (70.4%), TV sites (46.7%) and movie sites (37.1%) all have significant reach with Mexico’s Internet audience.
YouTube reaches 76% of Mexican Internet users and each visitor spends an average of 217 minutes per month on the site. This is not surprising given the established popularity of online videos among Mexico’s Internet users. According to comScore, online videos have 86.1% reach among Mexican Internet users and each viewer in Mexico watches an average of 157.6 online videos per month. Only Internet users in Chile watch more online videos a month: 162. This clear popularity of online videos in Latin America is what led to us creating the Jumba Video Network, which allows advertisers to connect with this huge audience.

Mobile
While smartphone penetration in Mexico is at 20%, slightly less than half the rate it is in the United States (47%), the mobile Internet is growing. In Mexico, 4.6% of all web traffic comes from mobile devices. This is more than double the rate of mobile device traffic in Brazil and Argentina, which are at 2.0% and 2.1%, respectively. In the United States, mobile devices account for about 20% of Internet traffic. Around 59% of the mobile web traffic in Mexico comes from iOS, while nearly 23% comes devices that use Android. In addition, 29% of Mexico’s mobile traffic comes tablets. Brazil is the only country in Latam with a higher percentage of mobile traffic from tablets—43.9%. As such, options such as the Jumba Mobile Network should figure more prominently in web campaigns targeting Mexico’s Internet users.

To find out how you can reach Mexico’s Internet users with a targeted, effective campaign, please contact us.

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ecommerce3

The Future of E-Commerce in Latin America

While it’s obvious that Latin Americans don’t buy online at the same huge volume of Americans or Europeans, it’s also obvious that the region’s e-commerce commerce market is no longer tiny and limited to just a wealthy few. According to a recent story from América Economía magazine, e-commerce sales in Latin America totaled $10 billion in 2007—and tripled to $30 billion by 2010. In 2011 e-commerce sales hit $43 billion and according to the magazine’s projections, online sales in Latin America will total $69 billion by 2013. While nowhere near the $161 billion in e-commerce spending of the United States in 2011, Latam has come a long way from the $1.6 billion in e-commerce sales it posted in 2003.

Brazil is the Biggest
It’s not surprising that the region’s largest country would be the biggest e-commerce market: currently Brazil accounts for 59% of the e-commerce sales in Latin America. In addition,  América Economía also notes that there are 173 million credit cards in Brazil, where the population totals 195 million. While this doesn’t necessarily mean that over 80% of Brazilians have credit cards, it does reveal one important factor that drives the size of the country’s e-commerce market. Another is the e-commerce division created by Correios, the country’s national postal firm, which currently has 40% market share in a shipping market with nearly 30 competitors. The country has also encouraged e-commerce by reducing taxes, interest rates and permitting free returns for products bought online. Given this, it’s no surprise that Wal-Mart, Apple and Amazon all have plans to open offices in Brazil this year.

Beyond Brazil
Mexico is #2 in e-commerce in Latin America, with 14.2% of the sales. The Caribbean is third at 6.4%, followed by Argentina (6.2%), Chile (3.5%), Venezuela (3.3%), Central America (2.4%) and Colombia (2.3%). The Asociación Mexicana de Internet released a study about e-commerce in Mexico for 2011 that covered buying habits and top-selling products. You can find it in our Resources section.

Recently, the Cámara Argentina de Comercio Electronico (Argentine Chamber of E-Commerce or CACE) released a study of the country’s online shopping market that showed growth of 49.5%.  Other interesting figures from the CACE study include:

• 29.5% of Argentina’s Internet users engage in e-commerce—9 million shoppers
• 57% of dotcom businesses have implemented an m-commerce option to handle the growing amount of shoppers who use their mobile phones to shop online
• The e-commerce market in Argentina will grow 41% in 2012 to reach a total of 16 billion pesos
• 75% of Argentina Internet users research products online before buying them offline
• 89.6% of Argentine online shoppers use local firms for e-commerce and the most popular is Mercado Libre, while 10% use foreign firms like ebay and amazon
• 63% of Argentines who buy products through the Internet use a credit or debit card, 49% pay cash and 6.7% use bank transfers

Find out more here.

Other Factors in Latam E-Commerce
In its coverage of e-commerce in Latin America, America Economía noted that the original projection was sales of $35 billion in 2011. To explain why sales ended up being greater ($43 billion), the magazine cited several contributing factors:

• The launch of newer firms like Geelbe like Cuponaso to supplement larger firms like Peixe Urbano and Mercado Libre
• Social gaming sites like Vostu and Mentez that contribute to e-commerce via the sales of lower-cost online games
• Other forms of social commerce via immensely popular sites like Facebook
• Companies offering customers the option to purchase products online but pick them up at the stores, which saves both money and time for them
• The explosion of Latin America’s mobile market, which has led to users making purchases via smartphones and tablets

To read the complete América Economía story, click here.

To find out how you can reach this growing market of Latin American consumers, please contact us.

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