Tag Archives: Latin American marketing

Facebook Network

How Top Companies are Using Social Media in Latam

It’s clear that social media are hugely popular in Latin America and reach more than 90% of the region’s 232 million Internet users. Given this, how are companies in Latin America using social media to further their marketing efforts? A new study from Burson-Marstellar analyzed these efforts by looking at the social media strategies of the top 25 companies in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, Uruguay and Venezuela.

We’ve grouped together some of the key takeaways of the study for marketing, media and advertising professionals.

65% ARE USING AT LEAST ONE SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORM
This is an improvement from 2010, when only 49% of the Latin American companies were using social media. However, Latam firms are clearly behind the rest of the world in this regard: globally, 87% of companies are using at least one social media platform.

BRAZILIAN AND VENEZUELAN COMPANIES LEAD THE REGION IN SOCIAL MEDIA USE
In 2012, 88% of the Brazilian companies and 84% of the Venezuelan companies analyzed by the Burson-Marstellar study were using social media platforms. Other countries in which a large percentage of top firms report using social media include Colombia (76%), Mexico (76%), Chile (76%) and Argentina (64%). The lowest percentage was found in companies in Puerto Rico, where only 28% of top firms use social media. However, only 5% of companies in Puerto Rico were using social media in 2010, so the rate quintupled in just two years, obviously indicating growth in this area. 

FACEBOOK AND TWITTER ARE THE PLATFORMS OF CHOICE
In 2012, 50% of the firms studied were using Facebook and 53% were using Twitter. In third place was YouTube (31%), with Google+ in fourth place (20%). This data is interesting when you consider that comScore results indicate that Google+ is not among the top social media sites in Latin America’s largest markets. For example, in November 2012, the top social media sites in Brazil in descending order were Facebook, Orkut, LinkedIn, Twitter, Ask.fm, Tumblr, Scribd, Badoo, Deviantart and Vostu. With the exceptions of Orkut and Vostu, these are the top social sites in Argentina, Mexico and Colombia.
Of course, the issue could be about fit. LinkedIn is for professional contacts, Badoo doesn’t accept advertising and is focused on meeting people, Deviantart is about posting artwork, Scribd is a document sharing site and Ask.fm is a Q&A site.
That said, Latin American firms may want to consider Pinterest, a site that many American firms are including in their social media mix. Pinterest is gaining ground in all of these markets and has cracked the list of the top 20 social media sites in Latin America, though not the top 10—yet.

COMPANIES IN BRAZIL AND MEXICO HAVE THE MOST TWITTER FOLLOWERS
Compared to 2010, companies in Brazil and Mexico have skyrocketed in followers. For example, Brazilian firms had an average of 4,206 social media followers per account in 2010 and in 2012 this figure reached 66,958; in Mexico, the average went from 2,240 social media followers to 43,107. That said, companies in other countries have also seen huge increases in the amount of followers per account:

  • Argentina: from 777 in 2010 to 19,023 in 2012
  • Chile: from 1,624 in 2010 to 13,000 in 2012
  • Colombia: from 525 in 2010 to 8,496 in 2012
  • Peru: from 85 in 2010 to 4,814 in 2012

In all of Latin America, the average amount of social media followers of these top 25 firms went from 2,626 to 33,077.

THE PERCENTAGE OF COMPANIES WITH FACEBOOK PAGES SPIKES IN ARGENTINA, BRAZIL, PERU AND PUERTO RICO

In these countries, the percentage either doubled or nearly doubled: up by 48% in Argentina, by 52% in Brazil, by 60% in Chile and by 52% in Peru. However, the firms in Colombia showed the most impressive growth. The amount of firms in Colombia with Facebook pages went up by 76% between 2010 and 2012.

BRAZILIANS TALK THE MOST ABOUT COMPANY FACEBOOK PAGES
An average of nearly 45,000 Brazilians are talking about company Facebook pages, much more than in any other country.  No other country in Latin America even comes close to this massive level of engagement. The country that occupies second place in the amount of people discussing company Facebook pages is Peru, with just 7,781 doing so.

30% OF LATIN AMERICA’S TOP FIRMS ARE SHARING CONTENT ON YOUTUBE
Mexico has the highest percentage of firms that share content on YouTube at 52%, followed by firms in Chile and Brazil (each with 48%) and Argentina (32%). These figures are somewhat surprising given that Latin Americans are watching online videos more than ever.

THE MAJORITY OF LARGE COMPANIES IN LATIN AMERICA ARE NOT USING GOOGLE+
Currently 20% have a Google Plus page, compared to the global average of 48%.

To explore how we can help you reach Latin Americans via social media or any other type of media, please contact us.

[twitter style=”vertical” float=”left”] [fblike style=”box_count” float=”left” showfaces=”false” width=”450″ verb=”like” font=”arial”] [linkedin_share style=”top” float=”left”] [fbshare type=”button” float=”left”]

Latam media landscape 2

Latin America’s Media Landscape 2015-2017

Predicting the future is always tricky, but different industry associations have made forecasts for different forms of media in Latin America for the next few years, all based on current trends. Using this data, here’s what experts say that Latin America’s media market will look like in the near future.

#1 THERE WILL BE 359 MILLION INTERNET USERS IN LATIN AMERICA BY 2015
Currently the population of Latin America is at around 575 million but according to the Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL), by 2015 Latin America will have 598 million people. (This count includes Puerto Rico, projected to have 4.1 million people by 2015, but excludes non-Spanish-speaking countries like Haiti and French Guyana.)
According to a May 2012 projection from Registro de Direcciones de Internet para América Latina y Caribe (LACNIC), by 2015 Internet penetration will reach 60% in Latin America. Since 60% of 598 million is 359 million, it appears that Latin America will add 127 million Internet users over the next 3 years to its current total of 232 million Internet users.

Not surprisingly, the growth will be driven by the powerhouse Internet markets. Brazil’s Comitê Gestor da Internet estimates that 80% of Brazil’s homes will have Internet access by 2015. Given Brazil’s population of 193 million and an average of 3.3 people per household, this means that by 2015 Brazil could have 154 million Internet users—up considerably from the 85 million it has today per comScore. LACNIC also predicts that Mexico will have 65 million Internet users by 2015, up hugely from its current total of 40.6 million. Other markets predicted to gain lots of new users include Chile (16.4 million Internet users by 2015) and Ecuador (7.5 million Internet users by 2015).

#2 PAY TV PENETRATION IN LATIN AMERICA WILL REACH 68% BY 2017
According to Dataxis, by 2017 pay TV penetration in the 7 biggest Latin American markets will reach 68% and offer advertisers and audience of 97 million people. The biggest growth markets for pay TV will be Brazil, Mexico, Colombia and Argentina. In addition, the head of Brazil’s national telecommunications agency (Anatel) recently said that 90% of Brazilian homes could have pay TV by 2018. For its part, Mexico could have more than 50% of pay TV penetration by 2015.

#3 LATIN AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS WILL GROW BY 5.5% PER YEAR THROUGH 2016
The downturn experienced by newspapers around the world does not seem to be affecting Latin America. According to a recent projection from PricewaterhouseCoopers, revenues for Latin American newspapers will grow annually by 5.5% through 2016 to reach US$10.4 billion.

#4 LATAM WILL HAVE 750 MOBILE CONNECTIONS BY 2015 PLUS MAJOR MOBILE DEVICE PENETRATION
According to the GSMA, Latin America will have 750 million mobile connections by 2015. Overall mobile penetration in the region is above 100%. Brazil’s mobile penetration is at well over 100%, as is Argentina’s, but in October 2012 Brazil reached a total of 258 million active mobile lines, up from 232 million just a few months back. Mexico is slated to reach 94% mobile penetration by the end of 2012 and over 100% by the first quarter of 2013.
Beyond simple penetration, mobile is changing Latin American markets through the adoption of mobile devices. It’s really not a question of whether a brand needs a mobile ad strategy for Latin America—it’s what this mobile ad strategy will be. Just look at the numbers:

To find out how we can help you reach Latin America via a strategic campaign across all media, please contact us.

[twitter style=”vertical” float=”left”] [fblike style=”box_count” float=”left” showfaces=”false” width=”450″ verb=”like” font=”arial”] [linkedin_share style=”top” float=”left”] [fbshare type=”button” float=”left”]

internet1

Why Online Ads Perform Well in Latin America

A recent worldwide survey conducted by Nielsen suggests that Internet advertising may be a particularly effective way to reach Latin American consumers. The Global Trust in Advertising Survey, published in April 2012, showed that Latin Americans respond more positively to online ads than people in other regions. Based on a survey of 28,000 Internet respondents in 56 countries, the Nielsen study asked Latin Americans about whether different types of online ads—on social media, those found in search engine results, banners and video ads—offered them relevant content. Compared to the global average, a significantly higher percentage of Latin Americans said that Internet advertising of all types offered them relevant content.
For example:

• 44% of Latin Americans say that the content in online video ads is relevant, compared to the global average response of 36%
• 53% of Latin Americans say the content in ads found next to search engine results is relevant, compared to the global average response of 42%
• 45% of Latin Americans say the content in ads on social networks is relevant, compared to the global average response of 36%
• 41% of Latin Americans say that the content in online banner ads is relevant, compared to the global average response of 33%

Nielsen’s study isn’t an isolated example. Studies from IAB Brazil and IAB Mexico, among other organizations, show the same kind of positive response to Internet advertising among Latin Americans.

To find out how you can connect with the growing Internet audience in Latin America, please contact us.

[twitter style=”vertical” float=”left”] [fblike style=”box_count” float=”left” showfaces=”false” width=”450″ verb=”like” font=”arial”] [linkedin_share style=”top” float=”left”] [fbshare type=”button” float=”left”]

Latin America’s Ad Spend Is Set to Skyrocket

According to projections from e-Marketer, between 2012 and 2016, Latin America will be one of the world’s fastest-growing regions when it comes to ad spend.

Total ad spend for Latin America is projected to reach US$34 billion in 2012 and grow to US$51 billion by 2016, 50% growth. In terms of rate of growth, Latin America and Asia-Pacific will grow the fastest in ad spend between 2012 and 2016.

E-marketer also notes that online ad spend will spike in all of the world’s markets, particularly in China, which is set to become the world’s #2 market in online ad spend by 2014. Latin America is set to register $3.62 billion in online ad spend in 2012. By 2016, Latin America’s online ad spend will be $7.68 billion, a 112% increase in just 4 years.

These numbers seem to be in line with those from other sources. For example, eMarketer projects 11.8% growth in ad spend for Latin America during 2012, while recently MagnaGlobal projected 13% growth for this year. In addition, a variety of sources have noted increases in ad spend and online ad spend in Latin America.

To get a sense of the growth trend, here’s a look at ad spend and online spend figures for major markets in Latin America in 2011.

• Argentina: 31.6% growth in overall ad spend in 2011, 117% growth in online ad spend for 2011
• Brazil: 8.5% growth in overall ad spend in 2011, 20% growth in online ad spend in 2011, 39% projected growth in online ad spend for 2012
• Chile: 10.4% increase in overall ad spend in 2011, 30% growth in online ad spend in 2011
• Colombia: 8.8% increase in overall ad spend in 2011, 33% increase in online ad spend
• Mexico: 36% increase in online ad spend in 2011
• Panama: 7.7% increase in overall ad spend in 2011
• Peru: 16% increase in overall ad spend in 2011, 37% increase in online ad spend in 2011
• Uruguay: 7% increase in overall ad spend in 2011, 50% increase in online ad spend in 2011
• Venezuela: 7.8% increase in overall ad spend in 2011

To find out how we can help you reach Latin America via a strategic campaign in any form of media, please contact us.

[twitter style=”vertical” float=”left”] [fblike style=”box_count” float=”left” showfaces=”false” width=”450″ verb=”like” font=”arial”] [linkedin_share style=”top” float=”left”] [fbshare type=”button” float=”left”]

Latam shoppers 1

What Latin American Shoppers Want

We recently covered what Latin Americans buy the most. However, it’s also helpful to understand the factors that influence the purchase decisions of Latin American shoppers and what they look for from both products and companies. Analyzing the following trends may help marketing, advertising and media professionals create even stronger campaigns.

Preference #1: Socially Responsible Companies
The facts: In a recent Nielsen survey, 77% of Latin Americans said that they prefer to buy products from socially responsible companies—and 49% would pay more for those products. The socially responsible qualities that the respondents seem to value the most in companies are environmentally sustainable practices, supporting small businesses, eradicating poverty and creating well-paying jobs. Nielsen’s survey also showed that 76% of the respondents look at the opinions and information that other people post online to find out about socially responsible companies.
The opportunity for advertisers: Creating online video diaries about a firm’s socially responsible programs in Latin America and promoting them through a crossmedia campaign that integrates social media, TV, print and online video sites. 

Preference #2: Being True to Themselves
The facts: The Global Monitor Study, released in 2010, focused on consumer attitudes in 20 countries, including several from Latin America. When asked what will help them succeed in today’s world, 95% of Latin Americans chose “being true to who you are” over “being the person others think you are.” The same survey also showed strong agreement with the statement “I am constant striving to improve myself and my abilities in as many ways as possible.”
The opportunity for advertisers: Focusing ad campaigns on the idea of being true to yourself and working in elements of self-improvement, perhaps by using social media. For example, a campaign that references being genuine and relates that to the brand could also work in a component—promoted via social media—that includes a contest with a prize of free courses in IT or another discipline that could help Latin Americans advance in their careers. This could speak to both preferences expressed by Latin American consumers while taking advantage of the deep reach of social media in the region. While it didn’t take strict advantage of this preference, a recent Coca-Cola campaign offers ideas for emphasizing individual aspirations among consumers in a compelling way:

http://youtu.be/b1rM8hSQgPQ

Preference #3: Cultural Traditions
The facts: The same Global Monitor study also indicated that a strong majority of Latin Americans are concerned about aspects of their cultures and tradition being lost as the world converges into a single global culture.
The opportunity for advertisers: With specific Latin American markets, advertisers can work in the concept of traditions into their messaging and extend this into social media via contests or sponsored events.
In 2011 Televisa, one of Mexico’s main television networks, launched a campaign called Tradiciones Televisa in honor of the country’s Bicentennial. The campaign focused on traditional festivities and attractions throughout the country, subtly associating the network with Mexico’s time-honored traditions.

To find out how we can help you reach Brazil, Latin America or U.S. Hispanics via a strategic campaign across all media, please contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.

[twitter style=”vertical” float=”left”] [fblike style=”box_count” float=”left” showfaces=”false” width=”450″ verb=”like” font=”arial”] [linkedin_share style=”top” float=”left”] [fbshare type=”button” float=”left”]

dreamstime_m_18771174

The 7 Hottest Products Among Latin American Shoppers

The new surge in purchasing power for Latin American consumers is being felt in all types of industries. To offer media, advertising and marketing professionals a quick reference guide, we put together a list of some of the hottest product categories among Latin American shoppers.


CARS
In 2011 car sales in Latin America went up by 7% to total 6.4 million units, which set a new record in the region: 12 vehicles for every 1,000 people. The most motorized company seems to be Argentina, with 20 vehicles for every 1,000 people, followed by Chile with 19.4 and Brazil with 17.7. In fact, 2011 was the best year ever for car sales in Argentina. Also, several carmakers had record-breaking sales in Latin America in 2011, including Audi, BMW, Nissan and Peugeot.


COMPUTERS

Latin Americans will buy nearly 40 million computers in 2012, according to market research firm IDC. This will be a 5% increase compared to 2011, during which Latin Americans bought 37.7 million computers. Growth will be marginal (0.3%) for desktop computers but laptop sales should go up by 8.7%. In addition, IDC forecasts that 2.1 million tablets will be sold in Latin America in 2012. Although it’s not a large percentage of the total, it could be an important trend with implications for mobile advertising.


COSMETICS
According to Research firm Euromonitor International, the total value of beauty/cosmetic and personal care products sold in Latin America in 2010 was $65 billion. These strong sales made Latin America the #4 market in the world for cosmetics/beauty products. Between 2005 and 2010 the Latin American beauty market doubled in size and now experts think the region will surpass North America to soon become the #3 beauty products market in the world.


LUXURY PRODUCTS
According to Boston Consulting Group, Latin America’s luxury market is growing by 15% every year. In Mexico, 5.2% of the population can buy luxury goods, according to consulting firm KPMG. Brazil’s luxury goods sales are expected to hit $12 billion this year, a 33% increase compared to 2011. Argentina is also a solid luxury market, moving 230 million euros in its luxury market in 2011. Given this, it’s no surprise that Sephora foresees opening 12 to 13 stores in the region and that Salvatore Ferragamo has announced expansion plans in the region.


MOBILE PHONES AND SMARTPHONES
During the second half of 2011, Latam smartphone sales went up by 25% to reach nearly 50 million units. Although the complete total of mobile phone units sold in Latin America in 2011 hasn’t yet been confirmed, it’s known that 31 million smartphones were sold in the region in 2011. In Argentina, 24% of the mobile phones sold in 2011 were smartphones. In Mexico, smartphone sales spiked up by 78% in 2011. In Brazil, 2011 smartphone sales jumped to over 100% higher than in 2010. And the smartphone surge continues: 40% of the mobile phones sold in Argentina during the first quarter of 2012 were smartphones. In addition, IDG predicts spectacular increases in smartphone sales in other countries this year, including a 43% upsurge in Chile and a 70% leap in Brazil.


REAL ESTATE
According to new figures reported by the Association of Miami Realtors, Venezuelans were the largest group of foreign buyers in 2011. That said, Brazilians and Argentines were not far behind. Thanks to these Latin American buyers, Miami real estate has gotten a strong—and quite welcome—push: home sales went up 46% in 2011.


TRAVEL
Trips to foreign destinations by Latin American tourists went up by 15% in 2011, according to Consulting firm IPK. According to IPK, the strongest markets for trips to foreign destinations from Latam are Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and Chile.
The United States is one of the most popular destinations for Latin American tourists. According to the U.S. Department of Commerce, 18% more Latin American tourists will visit the U.S. in 2012 than in 2011: 1.78 million. By 2016, the department estimates that 2.5 million Brazilians will visit the United States. In addition, Brazilians rank #3 in spending among foreign tourists that visit the U.S. They’re just behind Japanese and British tourists, spending $6.8 billion in 2011 during trips.

Florida is probably the most popular U.S. destinations for Latin Americans. In fact, 4 of the top 10 foreign countries who sent the most visitors to Florida in 2011 were Latin American: Brazil, Argentina, Mexico and Colombia. In addition, a survey by hoteles.com showed that Florida is the preferred foreign destination of both Argentine and Colombian tourists.

That said, Latin Americans don’t just travel to the U.S. Many enjoy traveling within their own region. For example, a recent survey showed that Argentine tourists rank 3 Mexican destinations—Mexico City, Riviera Maya and Cancun—among their top destination choices. And Brazilians are the foreigners that visit Argentina the most. More than 35% of the tourists that Argentina welcomed in 2011 were from Brazil, while Europe was in second place with 19.8%. For their part, when surveyed, Chileans say their favorite destinations are Argentina, Brazil and Peru.

According to Mandala Research, Mexicans seem to favor U.S. destinations, and one study showed they also outshop other tourists. On average, Mexicans spend 40% of their travel budgets at shopping malls, compared to Japanese tourists, who spend 25% of their travel budgets at malls, and British tourists, who spend 25%. The preferred U.S. destinations for Mexican tourists are Los Angeles, New York and Houston, although Miami and Orlando are also in the top 10.

To find out how we can help you reach Brazil, Latin America or U.S. Hispanics via a strategic campaign across all media, please contact us.

 

Clarins Continues Its Latam Growth

While Clarins has been in the Latin American market since the late 1970s, the region’s recent growth is unprecedented.  “I’ve seen growth of 20 percent a year and I think it will continue,” says Joël Palix, president of Clarins Fragrance Group. Historically, Latin America has represented 2-3% of the company’s turnover but now is close to 10 percent. In fact, Palix says that “the way it’s going, it will supersede the United States market sooner or later.”

What Clarins brands are experiencing seem to reflect the recent growth of Latam as a beauty market in general. For example, market research firm Euromonitor International noted that the retail value of beauty and personal care products sold in Latin America in 2010 was nearly $65 billion, making it the world’s 4th largest market, just behind North America.

As the region has become a bigger and bigger market for Clarins, it’s also influenced the company’s promotional efforts. For example, a couple of years ago Clarins selected Enrique Iglesias to represent its Azzaro Pour Homme brand because of his fame and personality—but what also played a role, says Palix, was that “we needed someone who would make an impact on Latin America.”

Upcoming Campaigns
This year the company expects to build on its past success in the region while introducing new products. One example is Aura, a perfume that Clarins created in partnership with Swarovski. Over the past 10 years Swarovski has opened stores all over Latin America. However, it was one of the few luxury brands without a fragrance, so Clarins saw an interesting opportunity in partnering to create and launch Aura. In addition, the companies were a good fit as family-owned luxury brands that share core values. To that end, Clarins is promoting Aura with a campaign this spring.

Later this year, the company plans another campaign in Latin America for its highly successful Angel perfume, leading up to a worldwide campaign in the fall that will celebrate the brand’s 20-year anniversary.

Another planned campaign this year will promote Azzaro Pour Homme, kicking off in Brazil on Father’s Day, August 12, and there will be a panregional rollout for the brand in the fall. Palix points out that Azzaro has been a perennial favorite in Latin America since its launch in 1978, with a cross-generational appeal that almost seems to be handed down from father to son.

Incorporating Internet
While Palix notes that traditional media like TV and print are powerful vehicles to promote Clarins fragrances, the firm is deeply involved in leveraging the power of online media. “We are convinced that the Internet and social media are critical,” he says. This is why the Angel campaign for this spring will have a strong online component. Palix and his team seem to be very well aware of the rapidly growing online market in Latam, particularly in Brazil. As such, Clarins is localizing the content of its Latin American Facebook pages to better engage the audience.

The company is also focused on having lines of communication open with bloggers and making sure that it’s part of the online conversation about its brands. “I think that it’s the future: collaborate with your customers, listen to them, involve them and bring them incredible content,” says Palix. For Clarins, that content includes not only what their customers say about their products but exclusive videos shot with stars like Eva Mendes, the worldwide face of Angel. “Fragrances are about design,” explains Palix, “but they also have a story, and you need to captivate the imagination of consumers with unique stories.” However, what sets Clarins apart from many other brands is its commitment to looking for new ways to tell its stories, including digital media. Considering the rapid rise of the Internet in Latin America, this could well ensure that Clarins’ growth in the region continues for years to come.

To find out how we can help you reach Brazil, Latin America or U.S. Hispanics via a strategic campaign across all media, please contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.

[twitter style=”vertical” float=”left”] [fblike style=”box_count” float=”left” showfaces=”false” width=”450″ verb=”like” font=”arial”]

shopping online

Almost 60% of Latin American Internet Users Are Buying Online

E-commerce is clearly growing stronger in Latin America. A recent survey of Internet users in Latin America shows that 59% report buying products online in the past year.

Research firm Tendencias Digitales did the survey, which included 18,000 Latin American Internet users in 13 countries. It’s important to note that the survey did not include Brazil, which research indicates is the top Latin American country for e-commerce. However, the survey did research the habits of Internet users in large markets such as Argentina, Mexico, Chile and Colombia.

The chart below breaks down the percentage of Internet users in each country that reported buying a product online in the past year. Argentina is clearly the leader at 71%, tied by Chile.

While this is just one survey, the results show some interesting parallels with other research into e-commerce in Latin America. For instance, Argentina’s e-commerce market spiked by 50% in 2011, while the head of Colombia’s Chamber of E-Commerce projects 100% growth for 2012. In Mexico, research from the Asociación Mexicana de Internet (AMIPCI) indicated that 8 out of 10 Mexican Internet users had made an online purchase. AMIPCI also projects a 28% increase in e-commerce in Mexico in 2012.

Beyond these 3 countries, other Latam markets are showing strong e-commerce growth. This may be why eMarketer estimates $15.2 million in e-commerce sales for all of Latin America (except Brazil) in 2012 and then a powerful jump to $28 billion in sales by 2015.

What are these Latam shoppers buying online? Well, the Tendencias Digitales survey suggests that these are the hot products:

  • Tickets for entertainment or travel
  • Computer accessories
  • Clothing/footwear/accessories
  • Books

Other research we’ve covered has shown a slightly different list for Latin America and specific countries, such as Argentina and Mexico.

To learn more about how we can help you reach Latin American shoppers all over the region or in specific countries, contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.

[twitter style=”vertical” float=”left”] [fblike style=”box_count” float=”left” showfaces=”false” width=”450″ verb=”like” font=”arial”] [linkedin_share style=”top” float=”left”] [fbshare type=”button” float=”left”]

Pay TV Reaches 50% of Latin Americans

Impressive surges in individual markets have led to a pay TV penetration rate of 50.9% in Latin America. According to the Latin American Council on Multichannel Advertising (LAMAC), Argentina and Colombia have pay TV penetration rates above 81%. In Brazil, pay TV penetration has grown 118% since 2008—so now 36.1% of Brazilians have access to pay TV. In Chile, the pay TV penetration rate is 63.9%, while in Mexico it’s at 40.5%.

Brazil’s recent growth in pay TV subscriptions has been particularly impressive. Anatel—the Agência Nacional de Telecomunicações or National Telecommunications Agency—reported recently that 12.2 million households in Brazil had pay TV. With an average of 3.3 people per household, this means there’s a pay TV audience of 40.2 million in Brazil. And despite its relatively low penetration rate, Mexico is also a significant pay TV market: in spring 2011 LAMAC reported that the country had 10.5 million households with pay TV.

What makes the 50% penetration rate all the more impressive was that an earlier projection by Dataxis indicated that Latin America would reach this by 2015. Instead, LAMAC now forecasts 63% pay TV penetration in Latin America by 2015.

To find out how we can help you reach Latin America via pay TV or any other form of media, please contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.

[twitter style=”vertical” float=”left”] [fblike style=”box_count” float=”left” showfaces=”false” width=”450″ verb=”like” font=”arial”] [linkedin_share style=”top” float=”left”] [fbshare type=”button” float=”left”]

banner-mobile-marketing-2

The Impact of Latam’s Mobile Revolution

Apparently, everyone in Latin America seems to have a cell phone these days. The region’s population is at 597 million but it has 630 million mobile phone connections. That’s a cellphone penetration rate of 105%, higher than the U.S. rate of 103%. The data is from the GSMA—a group of mobile operators that promote the GSM mobile system—in a report that the organization just released.

Its 630 million mobile connections make Latin America the world’s third largest mobile market, just behind Asia Pacific and Africa. However, that 630 million is set to jump even more: by 2015 Latin America will have 750 million mobile connections—a penetration rate of 130%.
But the significance here is not just that Latin Americans are buying lots of mobile phones. For professionals in media, marketing and advertising, it’s also important to consider the type of phones Latin Americans are buying and how they’re using them.

Smartphone Sales Spiking
First off, it’s important to note that 24% of the 13.7 million cellphones sold in Argentina in 2011 were smartphones, and these are obviously better for accessing the Internet. In addition, smartphone sales spiked by 165% in Brazil in the first 6 months of 2011 and IDC projected a 78% increase in smartphone sales in Mexico in 2011. In fact, analysis firm The Competitive Intelligence Unit projects that smartphone penetration should reach 23% in Mexico in 2012 and reach 50% by 2014. As such, the 9% penetration that smartphones had in all of Latin America in 2010 should reach 33% by 2014 and GMSA suggests it may reach nearly 60% by 2016.

Mobile Connections
As Latin Americans buy more smartphones and tablets, they use them to go online—skipping landline connections. GSMA reports that in Latin America, mobile broadband subscriptions have gone up by 127% per year over the past 5 years. And over the next five years, these subscriptions could go up by 50% every year. In fact, by 2015, Latin America should have nearly 333 million mobile broadband connections.
In addition, a survey of Internet users in 14 Latin American countries done by research firm Tendencias Digitales revealed that 70% of Latin American Internet users went online with their mobile phones. Further adding to the statistics was Brazil’s Communications Minister, Paulo Bernardo. He recently reported that 99.8% of the Internet service subscriptions in Brazil in 2011 were for mobile access, while only 22% were for service through a landline. This is in line with other studies showing that mobile has overtaken LAN houses to become the #2 way that Brazilians access the Internet.

The numbers suggest 3 developments that will impact the media market in Latin America:

#1) Mobile seems to be opening the door of Internet access in Latin America—so in the near future we will probably see studies from comScore, IAB, AMIPCI and other organizations showing major increases from the current 36.7% Internet penetration in the region.

#2) This Internet increase means a whole new wave of consumers connecting for the first time, making online media even more important for reaching all of Latin America or specific markets. The surge in online ad spend in Latam that we’ve seen in 2010 and 2011 could become even more powerful.

#3) Mobile advertising in Latin America may soon be challenging display and search in the battle for ad dollars.

To find out how we can help you reach the Latin American online market via a display, search mobile or video campaign, please contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.

[twitter style=”vertical” float=”left”] [fblike style=”box_count” float=”left” showfaces=”false” width=”450″ verb=”like” font=”arial”] [linkedin_share style=”top” float=”left”] [fbshare type=”button” float=”left”]