Tag Archives: IBOPE

10 must knows Brazil media

10 Media Must-Knows for Planners Targeting Brazil

The Brazilian government just published the results of its latest survey on media consumption, called Pesquisa Brasileira de Mídia (PBM). Partnering with IBOPE, the government interviewed more than 18,000 Brazilians to discover their media consumption habits. As we kick off 2015, the study offers some good data to factor into plans for campaigns.

#1 TV Still Rules in Brazil
For years, TV has ruled ad spend in Brazil and IBOPE consistently shows TV has having nearly 100% penetration in the country. The PBM confirms the dominance of TV. Brazilians watch TV 4.5 hours a day during the week and 4 hours and 14 minutes a day on weekends. More than 7 in 10 (73%) of Brazilians watch TV every day.

#2 Radio Has Intense but Less Extensive Use than TV
Brazilians listen to radio an average of 3 hours and 42 minutes a day during the week and their consumption drops to around 2.5 hours a day on weekends. The peak time for listening to the radio in Brazil is from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. However, radio doesn’t have the same level of use as TV in Brazil: 55% of Brazilians report listening to the radio anywhere from 1 to 7 days a week and only 30% listen to the radio every day.

#3 Online Radio Does Not Seem to Have Strong Reach
Despite the attention that online radio has received from the media, 80% of Brazilian radio listeners report using traditional radios and only 1% say they listen to the radio online. A larger percentage of Brazilians (8%) report using cell phones to listen to the radio.

#4 More Than Half of Brazilians are Not Online
The Pesquisa Brasileira de Mídia (PBM) reports that 51% of Brazilians said they do not use the Internet, suggesting 49% Internet penetration in Brazil. This is actually close to estimates by other firms using different methodology. For example, eMarketer estimates that Brazil’s 2014 Internet audience was 107 million—similar to the 105 million reported by IBOPE in 2013. Given that Brazil’s population is estimated to be 202 million, this means that Internet penetration is at 52% in Brazil, close to the figures from the PBM survey.

#5 Brazilian Internet Use Is Intense
Of the Brazilians who do use the Internet, 49% use the Internet 1 to 7 days a week, with 37% using the Internet every day—a higher percentage than Brazilians who listen to the radio every day (30%). Brazilian Internet users report using the Internet 4.5 hours a day during the week and 4 hours and 20 minutes a day on weekends, which makes the Internet the #2 medium after TV in terms of time spent.

#6 The Top Time for Brazilian Internet Use is 8 to 9 PM
Internet use reaches a brief peak in Brazil at 8 p.m. (the highest percentage of users are online at that time) and immediately drops after 9 p.m., reaching the low point between 12 a.m. and 6 a.m. At that point Internet use in Brazil climbs quickly to reach a peak at 10 a.m. and then dips a little after 11 a.m. but remains stable until it starts to rise at around 6 p.m. As such, you may want to experiment with these times when running ads or posting on social media in Brazil.

#7 A Majority of Brazilians Go Online with Mobile Devices
The respondents were asked what kind of device they use to access the internet and allowed to select more than one option. The largest percentage of Brazilians (71%) said they access the Internet via computer, but a large percentage (66%) also selected cell phones, while only 7% selected tablets. These results are in line with other surveys in which more and more Brazilian Internet users report going online with their cell phones.

#8 Facebook and WhatsApp Rule Among Brazilian Internet Users
When asked about their favorite social media or messaging apps, most Brazilians (83%) chose Facebook and WhatsApp was #2 with 58% reported usage among survey respondents. Other social sites seem to have much lower usage rates among Brazilian Internet users, like YouTube (17%), Instagram (12%), Google+ (8%), Twitter (5%). Skype (4%) and LinkedIn (1%).

#9 Less Usage for Print Media
The majority of respondents (76%) to the PSM indicated that they do not read newspapers while 19% reported reading them 1 to 7 days a week. Most Brazilian newspaper readers (79%) prefer to read them in print form, while only 10% prefer reading newspapers online and 4% in both print and online formats. When it comes to magazines, 85% of Brazilians surveyed said that they did not read magazines and only 13% reported reading them from 1 to 7 days a week.

#10 Brazilians Trust Newspaper Advertising the Most
Despite their lower usage of print as indicated in the survey results, 47% of Brazilians trust newspaper advertising most or all of the time, the highest level of trust among advertising in any form of media. Radio and TV advertising came in second (42% trust rate for each), followed by magazines (36% trust rate). Advertising on websites were only trusted by 23% of Brazilians and trust rates for social media ads was also low (22%).

Please contact us to find out more how we can increase efficiencies for Latin American agencies through media services like planning or buying or via advertising technology solutions like programmatic buying.

 

Media Penetration in Latin America

To help media, marketing and advertising professionals get a sense of the current media landscape in Latin America, below we’re sharing media penetration statistics from IBOPE’s most recent edition of its Media Book. Since IBOPE did not list 2012 media penetration figures for Mexico, our charts show 2011 data from IBOPE’s 2012 Media Book for México.

FREE TV/PAY TV PENETRATION IN LATIN AMERICA

Comments: Free TV’s deep penetration is consistent with other studies, and it’s interesting to note the significant growth of pay TV in certain markets, such as Honduras (84% penetration). The deep pay TV penetration noted for markets like Colombia (86%), Argentina (74%) and Chile (63%) are similar to figures reported by organizations like LAMAC.

RADIO PENETRATION IN LATIN AMERICA

Comments: Overall, these figures seem consistent with those reported by other sources, except for Brazil’s 49% figure, which contradicts an earlier 2013 post by IBOPE that indicated that radio reaches 73% of Brazilians and last year’s Media Book, which reported 76% penetration for Brazil. It could be that this is driven by the panel used to develop the number and the question they were asked, which seems to be the last time they listened to the radio. In addition, it’s important to note that according to the Encuesta Nacional sobre Acceso y Uso de Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación (National Survey about Access and Use of Information Tecnologies and Communication or ENTIC), 89.5% of homes in Argentina have a radio, significantly higher than the 62% listed here.


PRINT MEDIA PENETRATION IN LATIN AMERICA

Comments: These figures seem similar to other print media penetration figured reported by IBOPE in the past. It’s also important to note that print media in Latin America has experienced fewer challenges that in other regions and in fact PriceWaterhouse Coopers has forecast 5.5% annual revenue growth for Latin America through 2016. In addition, the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) recently reported that newspaper ad revenues in Latin America grew by 9.1% in 2012, the largest growth of anywhere in the world.


OOH PENETRATION IN LATIN AMERICA

Comments: These figures seem similar to other OOH penetration figured reported by IBOPE in the past.

INTERNET PENETRATION IN LATIN AMERICA

Comments: Colombia’s rate of Internet penetration seems surprisingly low, considering that Internet World Stats has reported 60% internet penetration. On the other hand, Brazil’s 60% rate of Internet penetration seems a bit high, given that IBOPE estimates there are 102 million Internet users in Brazil and the population totals 193 million, which yields an Internet penetration rate of 52.8%. It also seems unusual that Costa Rica would lead Latin America in Internet penetration at 71% given that Internet Worldstats reports a more modest figure of 43%.

To find out how we can help you reach Latin American consumers with a precisely targeted campaign in any form of media, please contact us.

Top advertisers in Brazil2

The Top Advertisers in Brazil in All Media

Recently IBOPE published a list of the top 30 advertisers in Brazil during 2012. The list is based on data from IBOPE’s Monitor Evolution product and tracks results with all major forms of media, including free TV, magazines, radio, newspapers, pay TV, cinema, Internet and OOH. Here’s the list of the top 15:


Major Online Advertisers

While we don’t have a list of top online advertisers in Brazil in terms of reales invested, comScore recently published a list of companies with the most display ad impressions. While this is obviously not the same as direct investment, this measure does suggest strongly which advertisers are more active in the online world in Brazil:

Given this massive level of investment and Brazil’s projected future status as the #5 advertising market in the world by 2014, it’s not surprising that O Globo recently reported that the revenue of digital agencies in Brazil more than doubled between 2010 and 2012. The source for this was the Brazilian Association of Digital Agencies (ABRADI), which indicates that digital agency revenues went from R$974 million (US$452 million) to R$2.2 billion (US$1 billion). As part of the growth, Brazil has seen an increase in the amount of digital agencies—from 2,518 in 2010 to 3,094 in 2012.

To find out how we can help you reach Brazilian consumers via media campaigns of all types, please contact us.

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why brazilians buy

Why Brazilians Buy

Marketers and advertisers are constantly looking to understand the motivations of their customers—the details that make the difference between adding a product to your shopping cart or leaving it on the shelf. While proprietary research offers insights for specific targets and products, some recent studies also offer some general guidance that all marketing, media and advertising professionals may benefit from. After a review, we identified a number of factors that spur Brazilians to buy, including:

Brand Reputation
Nearly half (49%) of Brazilians who responded to a survey from Draft FCB indicated that a brand’s reputation has the greatest weight when it comes to a purchase decision. In contrast, only 35% of U.S. consumers and 22% of German consumers gave the most weight to a brand’s reputation. In addition, a study from IBOPE Media showed that 66% of Brazilians (classes A, B and C) favor brands that have proven track records in the market, while 67% of class D Brazilians feel this way. Finally, in the same survey, 56% of Brazilians from classes AB think that a brand’s popularity means its products are of higher quality, while 59% of class C Brazilians and 67% of classes D/E Brazilians feel this way.

Discounts
In response to a survey from IBOPE Media’s Target Group Index, 83% of Brazilians said that it’s necessary for them to find discounts and deals before buying any product.

Durability
Another IBOPE survey showed that 70% of Brazilian consumers take durability into consideration when buying a product, along with price. Interestingly, this survey also showed that a product’s sustainability or a brand’s reputation for being concerned about the environment do not yet seem to strongly influence the purchase decisions of Brazilian consumers.

Previous Experience
Another Target Group Index survey showed that for 75% of Brazilians, their previous experience with a product determines their decision to purchase it.

Opinions of Family
In the same Target Group survey cited in the previous point, 68% of Brazilians say that the opinions of family members influences their purchase decisions. In contrast, only 31% of Brazilians said that friends’ opinions influence their purchase decisions.

Social Media
Recent data from IBOPE Media’s Many-to-Many study indicates that 77% of Brazilians follow brands on social media. However, it’s important to note that 84% of Brazilians under 34 follow brands on social media, underscoring the importance of social media when trying to reach a younger audience in Brazil.
On average, Brazilian women tend to follow brands on social media more than Brazilian men (82% of women follow brands versus 72% of men), and each Brazilian who follows brands on social media follows an average of 6 brands.
However, the most important statistic to consider from this study is that 84% of Brazilians take opinions of others on social media into consideration during a purchase decision. These Brazilian consumers say opinions found on social media are most relevant when they are considering the purchase of electronic products (64%), telephone services (50%) and tourism (38%).

Other key points to consider when it comes to Brazilians and social media:

  • Irrelevant or repetitive content posted by brands on social media are the main reasons Brazilians stop following them
  • For 60% of Brazilians, too many messages posted on social media by brands lead to unfollows
  • Promotions, learning new things about the brands and being a customer are the top reasons for Brazilians following brands on social media

Online Advertising
In another IBOPE survey done in 2012, 22% of Brazilians said that web ads served as motivation for them to buy products or services on the Internet during the past and 17% said that ads on sites they visited were instrumental in their purchase decisions. In addition, 49% said that online sponsorships are an effective way to advertise a product and 37% said that banners are useful for finding interesting subjects on the Internet. Finally, nearly half of Brazilians (47%) say they prefer ads that are related to the content on the websites they visit and 28% are influenced by advertising on social networks.
To explore how we can help you reach Brazil’s growing ad market, please contact us.

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brazil ad media main

Brazil’s Hottest Advertising Media

For years, the story from Brazil has been about explosive growth, and 2011 was no different, especially when it came to media. We took a look at a couple of top sources to get a sense of that growth.
Here’s where the media money went, who provided it, how much different media are growing and which media brands in Brazil are the most popular.


Major Money in Media

IBOPE reports that in 2011, total ad spend in Brazil went up 16% to top 88.3 billion reales (US$51 billion). This was less than Brazil’s 19% growth in ad spend in 2010 but still significant.


Online Heats Up Hugely

Both IBOPE and IAB Brasil report that 5.3 billion reales (US$3 billion) was the total ad spend for online in 2011. That’s a huge 69% increase compared to 2010, during which advertisers spent 3.1 billion reales for online advertising. According to IAB Brasil, in 2011 online made up 10% of Brazil’s overall ad spend. Internet ads are also split down the middle in terms of type: 50% of Brazil’s 2011 online ad spend went to search and the other 50% was for display. All of this money moving has clearly attracted big Internet brands to Brazil. LinkedIn opened an office there in September 2011, joining Netflix, Google, Facebook and Yahoo, which are competing with native Brazilian online brands like UOL, iG and Globo.com.


TV Still Looks Good

Not surprisingly, free TV remains the top medium in Brazil in terms of ad spend. IBOPE’s numbers say it commands 53% of the total spend, while pay TV got around 7.2 percent. Big numbers, but slightly less than in previous years. For example, GroupM reported that TV received 64.6% of total ad spend in Brazil in 2010. The lower numbers for 2011 are due to online’s rise and print’s strength in Brazil.


Print Still Has Plenty of Power

IBOPE reported that newspapers brought in 17 billion reales (US$9.8 billion) in 2011 and were #2 in ad spend in Brazil. As a category, Brazilian magazines were slightly behind pay TV in ad spend, with 7.2 billion reales (US$4 billion).
In addition, the Instituto Verificador de Circulação or IVC—which tracks print circulation and revenue in the country—reports that Brazilian newspapers gained 3.5% in circulation in 2011.
Brazilian magazine also broke records in 2011. The IVC reported that the average circulation for magazines in Brazil reached 13,735,919 copies between June 2010 and June 2011, a record amount and a 5% increase compared to the previous period studied, June 2009 to June 2010. The top-selling newspaper in Brasil in 2011 was Super Notícia, a tabloid-style paper which sold 300,000 copies a day. In second place was Folha, with 297,000 copies sold daily.


Best-Liked Brands
Recently, Troiano Consultoria de Marca collaborated with Meio&Mensagem to survey Brazilians about the media brands they most admire. Here’s a quick breakdown:

  • Free TV network: TV Globo
  • Pay TV channel: GNT, which is from the Globosat cable network
  • Magazine: Veja
  • Radio network: CBN
  • Internet portal: Google


Top Advertisers

According to IBOPE, the 5 biggest advertisers in Brazil in 2011 were:

  • Casas Bahia—3.3 billion reales
  • Unilever Brasil—2.6 billion reales
  • Ambev—1.3 billion reales
  • Reckitt Beckiser—1.1 billion reales
  • Hyundai Caoa—1.0 billion reales

Among the other big spenders in Brazil in 2011 were Fiat, Petrobras, Volkswagen, General Motors and Ford.

To find out how we can help you reach the Brazilian market with an innovative media campaign, please contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.

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class C women Brasil

New study: Women are Key to Reaching Brazil’s Class C

Attracting women seems to be crucial in reaching Brazil’s emerging class C. According to a new study called “As poderosas da nova classe média brasileira” conducted by research firm Data Popular and Abril Media, class C women are the key decision makers when it comes to purchases. Here’s a rundown of the key results.

Who’s in Charge?
• 82% of class C men say their wives manage the household budget
• 77% of class C men say their wives make most of the spending decisions, including what kind of underwear they use
• Out of every 100 reales in household income for class C, 41 of them (roughly 400 million reales) are from the woman’s work—hence her strong influence on what to buy

In fact, class C women bring in nearly half (47%) of the total income earned by all women in the country, compared to 22% from class A and 20% from class B.

What Women Want
Brazilian Class C women showed some interesting preferences in the study that both advertisers and media agencies should note. We organized them by relevant product category for quicker reference.

  • Beauty: 70% believe that beauty care increases the chances of success in life—and they spent 19 million reales on beauty products in 2010, an increase of 228% from 2002
  • Cars: 64.8% care most about engine power when it comes to cars and 44% finance their cars
  • Cell phones: 50% plan on buying a new cell phone in the next year
  • Computers: 66% have taken or are taking a computer course and 46% want to buy a notebook computer in the next year
  • Language classes: 38% want to take an English class
  • Perfumes: 56% of imported perfumes are bought by this segment
  • Pharmaceutical products: 56% of them purchase their household’s pharmaceutical products and 37.6% prefer generic brands to name brands
  • Real estate: 31% want to buy a new home in the next 2 years
  • Social media: 68.9% are on social media networks
  • Travel: 72% will travel in the next 12 months and 62% traveled in 2010, compared to 54% of class C men, and 48% of them prefer using travel agencies
  • Weight loss products: 39% want to lose weight

Brand Opportunities
When it comes to brands, class C women in Brazil already have favorite brands in areas like food, personal care, clothes, makeup, perfume and mobile carriers. However, they are still selecting their favorite brands in the following areas:

  • Banks
  • Cable TV
  • Cars
  • Clothing
  • Furniture/Decor
  • Shoes
  • Electronics

Go here to review more study results.

To learn more about how we can help you reach Brazil via online or other media, contact us at info@usmediaconsulting.com.

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