Category Archives: Colombia

01 e-commerce

The Hottest E-Commerce Products in Latin America

Ok, so we know that digital ad spend is set to grow by 114% in Argentina between 2015 and 2018. Digital ad spend will spike by 73% in Mexico between now and 2018 and go up by 49% in Brazil by 2018.

In fact, 75% of the ad spend growth in Latin America between 2015 and 2017 will come from digital advertising on desktop and mobile.

We also know that B2C e-commerce sales in Latin America went up by 22% in 2014 and will grow by nearly 14% in 2015.

So digital marketers and agencies should be well attuned to what Latin Americans are buying online. Of course, data that covers the whole region is tricky to compile since e-commerce development varies greatly from country to country in Latam. But we were able to discover which products are flying off e-commerce shelves in most of the larger Latin American markets.

Argentina flag

The Cámara Argentina de Comercio Electrónico (Argentine Chamber of E-Commerce) indicates that e-commerce sales in Argentina reached a total of 40.1 billion Argentine pesos (US$4.5 billion) in 2014.

What Argentines bought the most online in 2014 were travel products like tickets and hotel reservations: they spent more than US$1 billion on these and travel products made up more than 27% of total e-commerce sales.

Other top e-commerce products purchased in Argentina in 2014 include:

  • Electronic equipment and accessories (12.5% of total sales)
  • Food, drink and cleaning supplies (6.9%)
  • Appliances (5.3%)
  • Clothes (4.2%)
  • Tickets to shows and events (3.7%)
  • Home furnishings (3%)
  • Office supplies (2.3%)
  • Sporting goods (2.2%)
  • Auto and motorcycle accessories (2.1%)
  • Toys and games (1.6%)
  • Clothes and accessories for babies (1.5%)
  • Other (includes properties and vehicles) 27%


The 2015 Webshoppers report from ebit indicates that Brazil posted R$35.8 billion (US$11.4 billion) in e-commerce sales in 2014. As such, e-commerce sales in Brazil went up 24% in 2014. More than 51 Brazilians made an online purchase in 2014 and generated a total of more than 103 million orders. Nearly 10% of e-commerce sales in 2014 in Brazil were made with mobile devices, mostly through smartphones. In 2014 6 of every 10 m-commerce shoppers in Brazil were classes A or B.

Top products sold via e-commerce in Brazil in 2014 include:

  1. Fashion and accessories (17% of total sales)
  2. Cosmetics, perfume and personal care (15%)
  3. Appliances (12%)
  4. Mobile phones and phone products (8%)
  5. Books and magazine subscriptions (8%)
  6. Computer products (7%)
  7. Home furnishings (7%)
  8. Electronics (6%)
  9. Sporting goods (4%)
  10. Toys and Games (3%)

chile 3

The Cámara de Comercio de Santiago (Santiago Chamber of Commerce) estimates that e-commerce sales in Chile would exceed US$2 billion in 2014, an increase of around 20% compared to 2013, in which total e-commerce sales in Chile were nearly US$1.6 billion. The most recent data we could find about the products that Chileans buy most online comes from a GfK study that covered e-commerce purchases in Chile during the first half of 2014. According to GfK’s results, the top products purchased by Chileans via e-commerce were:

  1. Cell phones
  2. Television sets
  3. Tablets
  4. Washing machines
  5. Notebooks
  6. Refrigerators
  7. Stoves
  8. Netbooks


Colombia flag

A report from the firm PayU indicates that e-commerce grew by more than 41% in Colombia in 2014 to reach total sales of more than US$3.5 billion. It’s important to note that these are estimates from a private firm that reportedly reaches more than 80% of the market, as opposed to an independent study such as the one by e-bit or the CACE in Argentina. That said, PayU’s results are in line with projections from the Cámara Colombiana de Comercio Electrónico (Colombian Chamber of E-Commerce), which has yet to issue a report for 2014 e-commerce activity for the country. According to PayU’s results, the products that Colombians bought the most via e-commerce in 2014 were:

  1. Airline tickets and hotel reservations
  2. Coupons
  3. Electronic products
  4. Clothes and shoes

A 2013 study from The Cocktail Analysis identified differences in products between 3 groups they designated: sophisticated shoppers, advanced shoppers and entry point shoppers. However, when The Cocktail Analysis aggregated the results to show which products registered the most purchases relative to the total of all online shoppers in Colombia, the following products stood out:

  1. Electronics and computer products
  2. Travel products
  3. Clothes
  4. Telecommunications
  5. Leisure

As can be observed, these are similar results to those from PayU.


mexico flag

According to the Asociación Mexicana de Internet (The Mexican Internet Association or AMIPCI) e-commerce sales in Mexico totaled more than 150 billion pesos ($US9.6 billion) and increased by 24% compared to 2013. AMIPCI has not yet released its 2014 Mexico e-commerce report, so the list of hot e-commerce products for Mexico comes from the 2013 report:

  1. Plane or bus tickets
  2. Music and movies
  3. Computers
  4. Clothes
  5. Tickets to shows
  6. Hotel reservations
  7. Software

These results are fairly consistent with previous AMIPCI results on e-commerce in Mexico, suggesting that the hot e-commerce products in 2014 should not be that different.


While data for e-commerce sales in Uruguay doesn’t seem to be readily available, a small 2014 study by Agencia de Gobierno Electrónico y Sociedad de la Information (Electronic Government Agency and Information Society or AGESIC) surveyed more than 1,000 e-commerce shoppers in Uruguay to find out what they most bought online:

  1. Clothes
  2. Electronics
  3. Hotel/restaurant reservations
  4. Cell phones and accessories
  5. Home furnishing
  6. Appliances
  7. Service payments
  8. PC accessories
  9. Tools
  10. Books

Contact us if you need help reaching Latin Americans in general or in specific markets with an online display campaign or a programmatic buying campaign.

online trends latam

A Quick Roundup of the Latest Latam Online News

We run into tons of data as we plan campaigns for online media and programmatic. But since sharing all of it will glaze your eyes, below we break down some key recent developments in the Latin American online world with some links if you want to read further.

Latin Americans spend more time online than anyone else, use PCs to go online much more than mobile, are big on connected devices and are booking travel online in record amounts.

Argentines are making tons of online purchases, huge amounts of them check social networks from their phones and use Facebook way more than Twitter.

Brazilians are also buying online in massive amounts, respond well to video ads, book loads of online travel and their social network users are predominantly 18-34 years old.

Chileans lead Latin America in Internet penetration, mostly go online with smartphones, prefer Facebook hugely over Twitter, love news sites and are adopting Instagram in a big way.

Colombians love digital video, spend more time online than other Latin Americans, mostly all look for health information online and are adopting video on demand services in a big way.

Mexican millennials dominate Internet use, social media use and smartphone use, while Mexicans in general are shopping online in greater numbers while watching a ton of digital videos.

A significant amount of Peruvians are multiscreen users, they consume more web pages per person than the rest of Latin Americans, are growing hugely as fans of brands on Facebook and are visiting travel sites in droves.

Uruguay’s online audience spiked strongly in 2014, they lead Latin American in monthly online visits, they are predominantly under 35, spend more time on social media sites than other Latin Americans, and also overindex in their use of car sites, online gaming sites, business sites and news sites while shifting significantly towards going online via mobile devices.

Venezuelans consume more pages per visit than the rest of Spanish-speaking Latin America, the amount of Internet users in Venezuela went up by 19% in the past year and they spend significant amounts of time on retail sites, sports sites and tech sites.

Okay, now you’re caught up. Please contact us if you need help reaching Latin Americans in general or in specific markets with an online display campaign or a programmatic buying campaign.


Woman on a beach jetty at Maldives

What Latin American Luxury Travelers Want

With gross bookings by Latin American travelers expected to go up by 23% a year to reach US$98 billion by 2016, travel brands obviously have some significant opportunities. And within that larger Latam travel market is the luxury traveler market. Until recently, not a lot of data has been easily available for Latin American luxury travelers. But a new study by the International Luxury Travel Market and Travesías media offers insights about Latam luxury travelers through a survey of 90 owners and managers in the region who cater to this market. The study includes responses from travel agencies in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, Peru and Venezuela. So here’s what Latin American luxury travelers want:

To Travel to the United States, France or Italy
The USA was the top-selling destination for the agents, followed by France and Italy. The United Kingdom ranked fourth and Spain ranked fifth.

To Explore Both Familiar and New Destinations
When asked about their biggest growth destinations, the agencies named China and Thailand as the two main ones. While the USA was also a growth destination and ranked nearly as high as China and Thailand, most of the growth destinations were less famous destinations like Maldives, Croatia, Vietnam and the United Arab Emirates.

To Go On a Cruise
When asked about the popularity of cruises among clients, 66% of the agencies said that cruises were popular, very popular or most popular among Latin American luxury travelers.

To Go in Groups
When asked about the demographics of their clients, only 24% of the agencies said they had single travelers. The large majority said they cater to families (89%) or couples (84%).

To Travel a Lot
More than a third (35%) of the agencies surveyed indicated that they had 3 bookings a year per client, compared to just 2% with one booking. And 40% indicated they had 4 to 5 or more bookings a year per client.

To Stay a While, But Not Too Long
The majority (78%) of Latin American luxury travelers have an average travel booking length of between 5 to 15 days. More than half (52%) have bookings of 10 to 15 days. Only 5% book for between 1 to 5 days and only 7% book for 15 to 20 days.

Contact US Media Consulting if you need help with media buying for a campaign targeting Latin Americans with any time of media, including programmatic.

Cartoon phone man king

Latin America Leads the World in Smartphone Growth

Market research firm GfK recently released its figures for smartphone growth and it looks like Latin America is leading the world in this area.

Smartphone sales in Latin America totaled 68.7 million in 2013 and went up by 59% in 2014 to total nearly 110 million units. In terms of sales value, Latin America is again the leader when it comes to smartphones: US$31 billion in 2014 versus US$20.6 billion in 2013—a 52% increase.

Here’s a graphic to illustrate the numbers and show the numbers in different markets:

Latam leads in smartphone sales

For advertisers and agencies, these numbers clearly point to the advantages of investing more in mobile campaigns and may explain the powerful growth in mobile advertising in Latin America that was recently projected by eMarketer. One challenge is determining exactly how to invest in mobile marketing in Latam: apps vs. mobile internet, for example. We have some advice on that here.

Please contact us to find out more how we can increase efficiencies for Latin American advertisers and agencies through media services like planning or buying or via advertising technology solutions like programmatic buying.

Man With Smart Phone

The Data Every Latin American Digital Marketer Needs

With oceans of data floating around, all from different sources and sometimes conflicting, it’s key to be able to drill down to the essentials. So in this post we do exactly that with the Latin American online market. A quick scroll down will show you some key numbers you can use for background in preparing proposals or memos or for sharing with colleagues.

Market Size
Emarketer estimates there are 309 million Internet users in Latin America and that by the end of 2015 there will be more than 331 million. Here’s a look at eMarketer’s projections of Latin American Internet users with certain larger markets broken out (click to enlarge):

Internet users in Latam 2013 to 2018

Average CTR for Online Ads in Latin America
Even though comScore and other sources rightfully point out that CTR is not really the best measure for the effectiveness of online ads, just for reference, Sizmek reported the following:

  • Average CTR for a banner ad in Latin America: .12%
  • Average CTR for rich media ads in Latin America: .29%
  • Average CTR for rich media polite video formats: .48%
  • Average CTR for polite banners in Latin America: .15%
  • Average CTR for expandable banners in Latin America: .19%

Email Marketing
While we don’t have recent numbers for all of Latin America, in late 2012 Return Path—an email intelligence company—reported that Latin America had the lowest inbox placement rate of all regions studied: 69%. In September 2014 Return Path noted that Brazil had 60% inbox placement rate for emails, compared to rates of more than 80% in the U.S., Canada, U.K., France, Germany and Italy.

According to eMarketer, 194 million Latin Americans access the Internet with mobile phones and of these 126 million do so via smartphones. By the end of 2015 there will be more than 152 million smartphone users in Latin America and Chile will lead the region in smartphone penetration with 55.5%.
While in 2015 Mexico will have the highest tablet penetration in Latin America at 35%, Brazil will have nearly 35 million tablet users in 2015 compared to just under 23 million in Mexico. Overall, by the end of 2015 more than 92 million Latin Americans will own tablets. Given that the Population Reference Bureau reports that the region has a population of 618 million, this means that there will be nearly 15% tablet penetration in Latin America by the end of 2015. Below are some data tables from eMarketer on smartphone penetration and tablet penetration in Latam (click to enlarge):

smartphone penetration latam

tablet penetration Latam
Smartphone Shopping
According to a 2014 study from ING Global Solutions, 54% of Latin Americans have bought a product with their smartphones (click to enlarge):

Smartphone shopping

Online Videos
A couple of sources offer guidance in this regard. The Digilats study from JWT surveyed more than 9,000 Latin American Internet users from 9 countries and found that 67% said they watched online videos (click to enlarge):

Latam study streaming and other online activities
ComScore has a different set of numbers (click to enlarge):

Online video viewers Latam

Now, it’s important to note that comScore lists a smaller amount of Internet users for countries than other sources. For example, if we extrapolate out the numbers above, it would seem that comScore is reporting a total of 75 million Internet users in Brazil, while both IBOPE and eMarketer indicate that their more than 100 million Brazilian Internet users.

In addition, data from Google and TNS indicates that Internet users in Brazil watch online video ads more frequently than those in Argentina or Mexico. In fact, 36% of Brazilian Internet users say they watch online video ads every day. Brazilians are also more likely than other Latin Americans to watch mobile video: 35% of Brazilian smartphone users watch mobile online videos at least daily, compared to 25% of Mexican smartphone users and 19% of Argentine smartphone users.

Online Reviews
The Digilats study of Latin American Internet users by JWT indicated that significant percentages of Latin Americans are reading online reviews of products (click to enlarge):

Digilats product review

Online Research Before Purchase
A recent eCMetrics study of Christmas shoppers in Latin America showed that a majority of Latin Americans tend to research products online before purchasing, including reading product reviews. This dovetails with results from other studies. For example, the Consumer Barometer study from TNS and Google showed that 47% of Argentines researched their last purchase online and offline while 53% of Brazilians AND 53% of Mexicans reported doing the same thing.  In addition, the JWT Digilats study showed the products that Latin American Internet users were most likely to search online (click to enlarge):

Products researched online latam

Social Media
It’s fairly obvious that this is a huge area with Latin American Internet users. Some of the key takeaways with this would be:

>>>Latin Americans spend more time on social media than people from any other region (click to enlarge):

social media engagement latam


>>>The overwhelming majority of the time that Latin Americans spend on social media is spent on Facebook (click to enlarge):

Facebook dominance Latam

>>>Mobile is increasingly becoming an important way for Latin Americans to access social media (click to enlarge):

mobile social media users in latam

Contact us to find out more how we can help you reach Latin American Internet users with digital media buying or via MediaDesk, Latin America’s premier programmatic buying platform.

Latam digital music

Digital Music Cranks Up in Latin America

Both online music downloads and digital music subscriptions are on the rise in Latin America.

According to the most recent digital music report from the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry or IFPI—released in November 2014—Latin America posted 27% digital music revenue growth in 2013. Overall, revenues from digital music grew by 124% in Latin America between 2010 and 2013.

According to the Federation’s report, a number of Latam countries had powerful individual growth, including Peru (149%), Colombia (85%) and Argentina (69%).

But IFPI is not the only source that points to digital music growth in Latin American countries.

Ipsos-Napoleón Franco’s Technology Tracker study, released in 2014, indicated that 37% of Colombian internet users stream music, compared to the 49% that buy CDs.

The Mexican Association of Phonographic Producers (Amprofon) reported a 130% increase in revenues from streaming music services in Mexico during the first half of 2014. Streaming revenues totaled 175 million Mexican pesos in the first half of 2014, while digital music sales went up by 14% to reach 428 million Mexican pesos in the same period. Overall, 59% of the revenues generated by the Mexican music industry in the first half of 2014 came from digital sources, either streaming or purchases.

A recent study from Opinion Box indicated that 28% of Brazilians stream music, though 76% still prefer to listen to music via traditional radio. However, another study from Opinion Box—done in June 2014—surveyed 1,484 Brazilian Internet users and found that 76% listened to music on their cell phones. Of these, 84% listen to MP3 files, 65% listen to the FM radio embedded in the device and nearly 31% use streaming music apps. In addition, while 2014 numbers aren’t available yet, the Associação Brasileira de Produtores de Discos, (Brazilian Association of Record Producers or ABPD) reported that digital music sales in Brazil went up by 22% in 2013 and that digital sales accounted for 36% of total music sales.

What to Do with This Data
While it’s tricky to find large scale spikes in digital music consumption for every Latin American country, there’s enough data for the larger markets to suggest a significant change is taking place. For advertisers and agencies, this means that looking into ad solutions from sites like Deezer may deliver some strong results with campaigns, especially with the younger age groups (15 to 24, 25 to 35) that make up the majority of Latam’s Internet users.

Please contact us to find out more how we can increase efficiencies for Latin American agencies through media services like planning or buying or via advertising technology solutions like programmatic buying.

The Hottest Products Among Christmas Shoppers in Latin America

While February may not seem like the right time to cover Christmas shopping, it’s clear that advertisers spend more during the holiday season and that CPMs and conversions also tend to rise.  As such, Q1 2015 can be a good time to fine-tune plans for Q4 2015 campaigns. To that end, we reviewed some data from eCMetrics and eCGlobal on Christmas Shoppers in Latin America. The firms surveyed more than 1,000 Latin Americans from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Peru and Venezuela. The findings may help agencies and advertisers strengthen their holiday ad campaigns for 2015.

Target Last-Minute Shoppers in Latam
According to the study results, only 43% of Latin Americans had bought gifts by the 5th day before Christmas, i.e. December 20th. This means that advertisers have 5 days to reach the majority (57%) of Latin American Christmas shoppers and they may want to factor this into their media buys during this time.

Have a Strong Online Campaign in Place
More than 8 in 10 (82%) Latin American Christmas shoppers searched on the web before buying Christmas presents. The eCMetrics survey indicated that most shoppers searched for product price (74%), while a significant amount (49%) looked for product comments and smaller amounts looked for store ratings (27%) and store comments (26%).

Driving Store Traffic Still Very Important
Despite their strong penchant for researching products online, only 7% of Latin American Christmas shoppers shop exclusively online. More than half (51%) shop exclusively in brick-and-mortar stores while 42% shop in stores that offer online shopping. That said, 15% of Brazilian Christmas shoppers shop online, reflecting how Brazilians are becoming more and more comfortable with e-commerce.  Overall, however, this suggests brands need a strong online presence combined with special offers to drive consumers to the stores.

Top Hot Products for Latin American Christmas Shoppers
In descending order, here is a look at the products that Latam Xmas shoppers buy the most:

  • Fashion (clothes, shoes): 80%
  • Electronics (tablets, TV, laptops): 50%
  • Entertainment (video games and consoles): 30%
  • Mobile phones: 30%
  • Books:             30%
  • Home appliances: 30%
  • Travel products: 18%
  • DVD/Blue Rays: 9%

Setting Budgets—and Going Over Them
The study also found that 6 out of 10 Latin Americans set a budget for their Christmas shopping and the largest percentage of those who set budgets are Mexican (69%). In addition, nearly 8 out of 10 (78%) Brazilians report going over budget with their Christmas shopping.

Black Friday Big in Brazil
The study also showed that Black Friday has gained lots of ground in Brazil: 54% of Brazilians report buying items during Black Friday events. Nine of 10 Brazilian Black Friday shoppers bought their products online and nearly all searched online before buying. The majority (79%) did price searches but  a smaller amount (30%) also searched for product opinions. With good discounts available, the products that Black Friday buyers in Brazil were most interested in were electronics (57%), clothing (36%) and computer products (36%).

To find out more about what customers know before they enter a store, contact Ivan Casas of eCMetrics.

Contact US Media Consulting if you need help with media buying for a campaign targeting Latin Americans—whether it’s during Christmas or any other time of the year—with any time of media, including programmatic.

mobile ad buy

4 Keys for Mobile Media Buying in Latin America

Study after study indicates that there’s a major mobile migration happening in Latin America, with a big projected growth in device adoption, mobile Internet use and m-commerce. But mobile media buying in the region still offers some challenges. That’s why we put together this basic guide about the key factors to factor in when buying mobile media in Latam.

1 apps
#1: Mobile Web Versus Applications
Mobile ads run in two basic areas: mobile internet and apps. Mobile internet means the mobile versions of Web sites that people go to by using their mobile phones or tablets. And mobile ads are also sold on apps like Facebook, Deezer and Preguntados. It’s a matter of context, i.e. seeing an ad on the mobile version of a Web site like you would when you go to the site with a PC or laptop or seeing an ad while using an app, maybe an interstitial video or banner that comes up before you start a new game of Candy Crush, for example. You also have to factor in different metrics. With mobile Internet the metrics are similar to those of a regular online campaign but with apps you have to look at average daily users, how much time people spend using the app, their demographic group, etc.
Although apps have gained a lot of ground in Latin America, there are some disadvantages for media buyers and planners. First, not all of these apps run ads. For instance, WhatsApp doesn’t run ads, even though it’s used by 61% of mobile users in Latin America, according to GlobalWebIndex.
Second, apps don’t seem to have ultra-heavy penetration (90% or more) among Latam mobile users. We just saw that WhatsApp, though very popular, only reaches 61% of mobile users in the region. And if we look at a specific market like Argentina, we see that the Facebook app is the country’s most popular app—yet it’s only been downloaded by 76% of mobile users. So you have to factor in that penetration issue when buying in-app ads.
Third, if you buy in-app ads from an ad exchange just to get at the most inventory you can, since you’re not buying directly, the spend may not be as cost-efficient as you—or the client—would like.

2 feature vs smart
#2: Feature Phones Versus Smartphones

When you run a mobile campaign in Latin America, you have to factor in the type of device. Feature phones are still used by quite a bit of people. According to eMarketer’s estimates, out of the 400 million mobile users in Latin America, there are 194 million mobile users in Latin America that use their mobile phones to go online…and these are obviously who can see mobile ads.  Of these 194 million, 126 million or so have smartphones, while about 68 million still use feature phones to access the Internet. Given this, you may want to consider putting around 30% of the spend towards ads served on feature phones. Without this, you may not see optimal reach or fulfillment.

3 tablets
#3: Tablets Are Far From Universal

Emarketer estimates that there is a 32% penetration rate for smartphones in Latin America. No surprise here, especially given that smartphone sales have been strong for years. And even if tablets have also sold well in Latam, their sales don’t stack up to those of smartphones. For example, in Q2 2014 tablet sales in Mexico went up by 107% to reach 1.8 million. Great, but in the same period Mexicans bought 6.7 million smartphones. In Q3 2014, Brazilians bought more than 2 million tablets and it’s projected that they will buy more than 10 million in all of 2014. Yet just in Q3 2014 more than 15 million smartphones were sold in Brazil—and it’s projected that 2014 smartphone sales in Brazil will top 55 million. As such, this factor of 4 or 5 in sales volume difference between smartphones and tablets should be considered when you buy mobile ads in Latin America. Unlike smartphones, tablets allow for the same type of display ads that can be viewed on a PC or laptop because tablet screens allow the same web page to be displayed with the same ad formats. This allows for additional segmentation without major modifications of the elements used in a digital campaign.

4 responsive
#4: Not All Sites Are Ready for Mobile

Before running a mobile ad campaign for a brand, it’s important for media agencies to find out the following about the site where the mobile ads will take users:

  • Does the site have a responsive design that allows it to be viewed well with a mobile device?
  • Does the site have short, easy to use forms for users to fill out?
  • How fast is conversion time for the site?

Without a responsive design for a site, a user will click on the mobile ad and find a site that’s difficult to navigate with their device and probably leave quickly. Or if a brand wants subscribers to a service but has a mobile online form with 10,000 fields or that’s difficult to fill out with a smartphone, the user will probably give up and leave. The same applies if a site doesn’t have a quick and easy purchase process for its product once the mobile ad drives the users there. All of these factors can kill mobile ad performance and believe it or not, lots of brands do not factor this in when deciding to run a mobile ad campaign. This makes a big difference with apps and sites, since ultimately what counts is the user experience and this in turn will have a direct relationship with a campaign’s performance.

Ok, so clearly there are a number of factors to consider when running a mobile ad campaign that can quickly become obstacles.

Fortunately, there’s a way to cut through many of these complications. MediaDesk—the leading programmatic buying platform in Latin America—has put together a substantial mobile ad inventory, and there are several advantages with using MediaDesk’s platform to buy mobile ads:

  • A real time bidding (RTB) system that allows for a smarter, more transparent spend
  • The ability to buy ads and observe the real cost of impressions during campaigns and adjust pricing as need to deliver greater fulfillment as needed
  • Reaching mobile users in Latin America with any type of mobile device or operating system
  • Reaching consumers in all levels of their user experience of a brand and being able to compare and analyze in real time the way that consumers react to different messages in different devices (smartphones, feature phones, tablets or PCs)

Contact us to get a free demo of MediaDesk and get a direct sense of the power of mobile programmatic buying.



7 Top Trends among Colombian Internet Users

A quick review of some key studies reveal key shifts among Internet users in Colombia:

#1 Smartphone Use Spikes
Colombia has surpassed Argentina to become one of the top 3 smartphone markets in Latin America. In 2014 there were 14.4 million smartphone users in Colombia and in 2015 there will be more than 16 million Colombian smartphone users. In comparison, in 2015 there will be 12.6 million smartphone users in Argentina.
The top smartphone markets remain Brazil (nearly 49 million smartphone users in 2015) and Mexico (34 million). Overall, 45% of consumers with a mobile phone in Colombia own a smartphone.
Source: eMarketer

#2 More Time Online
Colombian Internet users average 1,404 minutes a month online, higher than the average for Latin America (1,298 per month) and not far below the monthly Internet usage of Europeans (1,659). Per visit, Colombians consume 37 pages of Internet content, #2 in Latin America after Brazil, with 40 pages per visit.
Source: comScore, 2014 Futuro Digital Colombia

#3 Mobile Internet Use Surges
Nearly 24 million Colombians are now using the mobile Internet. This represents a 58% increase compared to 2013.
Source: Asómovil (an association of top mobile providers in Colombia that includes Claro, Movistar and Tigo-UNE)

#4 E-Commerce Grows
In 2013 e-commerce transactions in Colombia totaled more than US$2.5 billion and it’s projected that in 2014 e-commerce growth in Colombia will be 25% to 30%. In 2014 52% of Colombian Internet users made an online purchase of a good or service.
Source: Cámara Colombiana de Informática y Telecomunicaciones

#5 Social Remains Strong
Colombians spend at least 13 minutes a day on Facebook and total up more than 54 million likes a day on this social network. Colombian Internet users spend 6 minutes a day on YouTube and 68% use Twitter at least every couple of days. More than 93% of the total time that Colombians spend on social media is spent on Facebook.
Sources: Ericcson Consumer Lab, Ipsos Tech Tracker, comScore

#6 Enthusiastic about Entertainment
Per online visit, Colombian Internet users consumer more than 10 pages of entertainment content, more than any other country in Latin America. YouTube is the leader in the entertainment category in Colombia in terms of unique users. The reach of online video is highest in Colombia: 88% of Internet users watch online video, slightly ahead of Brazil (with 87.8%) and ahead of Argentina (85.5%), Chile (84%) and Mexico (81%). Each month, there are 24.6  million unique viewers of online videos in Colombia who spend 216 million hours watching a total of more than 3.1 billion videos. This means that each Colombian Internet user watches 126 online videos per month, on average. Although YouTube is the #1 video site in Colombia and draws more than 21 million unique viewers a month, Facebook is closing the distance and draws more than 16 million unique viewers a month, followed by VEVO with 15.6 million.
Source: comScore, 2014 Futuro Digital Colombia

#7 Top CTR for Banners in Latam
With an average CTR of .12% for banner ads, Colombia is tied with Brazil and is ahead of other countries in Latin America.
Source: comScore, 2014 Futuro Digital Colombia

Please contact us to find out more how we can increase efficiencies for Latin American agencies through media services like planning or buying or via advertising technology solutions like programmatic buying.


Flying dollars banknotes isolated on white

Where Ad Investment in Latin America Should Go in 2015

The challenge that every marketer faces is how to develop a media budget that delivers the best results. Making changes to your approach is hard, not only because of the risk but also because of the need to sell other people in the company on those changes. But as the media landscape changes, it’s actually a bigger risk to make no changes, since you can easily fall out of step with your customers. In reviewing the data, here are some areas that both brands and media agencies need to look more closely at in executing their 2015 campaigns.

#1: Mobile Programmatic
Mexico clearly leads Latin America when it comes to mobile ad investment and is set to reach US$287 million by next year, while Brazil mobile ad investment will reach US$245 million and Argentine mobile ad spend will be a surprisingly small US$14.5 million.

But this modest level of investment doesn’t seem to jibe with the mobile boom happening in Latam. For instance:

And if those numbers aren’t enough to get the point across, see how smartphone penetration, tablet ownership and mobile Internet user are growing in other Latam markets, including Chile, Peru, Colombia, Ecuador and Venezuela.

Now to programmatic. We know that programmatic ad spend is set to spike dramatically in Latin America, so definitely the industry knows this works. The advantages of the tight targeting of programmatic are becoming clearer, in addition to the fact that it may deliver a more efficient spend than manual online ad buying.

Given this, it seems logical that brands need to deepen their mobile spend. And if the concern is that mobile may be a risk, why not look at some trials with mobile programmatic? Sharper targeting could lead to even better results with mobile and allow brands to fully take advantage of an audience that’s using smartphones more and more in the purchase process.

As such, it seems clear that brands need to run programmatic mobile trials and increase their conventional mobile ad spend in 2015. We can help with this: find out more here.

#2: Social
The numbers on social make things pretty clear:

Ok, so we know we have a good audience. Then why is social network ad spending in all of Latin America only estimated to be US$481 million in 2014 and only to increase by 23% in 2015?

Per user, advertisers will spend US$2.52 on social network advertising in Latin America, compared to $46 per user spent in North America and $27 per user in Western Europe.

How does this make sense when comScore reports that the average social media user in Latam spends 8.67 hours a month on social media versus 8.07 hours spent by Europeans and 6 hours a month spent by North Americans?

>>>The Approach with Social
There are several ways brands should leverage this Latam love of social in 2015:

Facebook retargeting. On one hand, we have 200 million Facebook users. On the other, in 2014 we have e-commerce growing by 40% in Argentina, by 23% in Brazil, by 20% in Mexico and by 45% in Colombia. So obviously it makes sense to retarget people who visit e-commerce sites with ads on Facebook. You can find out more on how that works here or just contact us directly since we’re experts in this area and partners with Triggit, a leading company in Facebook Exchange retargeting around the world.

Native advertising and content marketing. Do any of you know how much Latin American marketers are spending on native advertising or content marketing? Many of us don’t know yet, and the reason is because no surveys that report tactical spend by Latam marketers has been released. But it doesn’t seem to be much, if at all.

And what a missed opportunity. Mobile Internet is expanding hugely in Latin America and part of that entails people checking social networks on their cell phones: 30% of Mexicans, 37% of Chileans, 32% of Argentines and 19% of Brazilians, according to one study. But other studies confirm this trend: see here, here and here.

This means that people are checking their Facebook feeds, scrolling down: this makes it the perfect place for you to include a sponsored post that’s part of your content marketing. A recent survey of American marketers showed that 23% are devoting more than half of their 2015 budget to content production. Why? Because posts on topics and videos, for example, are good ways to engage people and sell. A post can lead back to a mini-site where your content lives—along with banners to convert people. Or you can set up a content channel on a portal—something we helped a client do with iG a few years ago and which worked very well. And you can leverage content even further with mobile: 55% of Brazilians recently said that video was their preferred format for mobile ads.

Sponsored social. This trend has taken off in the U.S. and it makes sense: use social media users with strong followings to promote brands. A recent study showed that 52% of American marketers had used this tactic in 2014, nearly as many as those who used online display advertising (58%). This could be a trickier tactic to deploy but it definitely merits some trials considering the potential it has.

Bottom Line
As an industry, we’re skipping around the surface of the potential of digital in Latam with light investments. It’s not about jumping on the bandwagon to be cool. It’s about adjusting our business practices to our audience habits. And that’s just good business.

Contact us to learn more about how we can spike your response in 2015 via mobile, programmatic, mobile programmatic, Facebook retargeting, social and a deeper dive into digital campaigns.