Brazil m-commerce

M-commerce Takes Off in Brazil

A recent study from Pagtel—a Brazilian mobile payments company—and Mobi.life, from the group E.life, asked 480 Brazilian mobile users about their mobile shopping habits. The results suggest that mobile commerce is growing rapidly in Brazil:

  • 67% of Brazilian mobile users said they made mobile purchases in 2014, compared to 57% in 2013
  • 60% of Brazilian mobile shoppers used store websites, 37% used intermediate services like PayPal or Buscapé, 32% used app stores like Google Play and 24% used shopping applications
  • 54% say they access banking services via smartphones and 22% use tablets for online banking

Hot Products in Brazil’s M-Commerce
Respondents indicated that they favor buying certain products via mobile commerce, including:

  • Tickets (61%)
  • Virtual content (55%)
  • CDs, books and DVDs (47%)
  • Food delivery (44%)

Factors that Impede M-Commerce in Brazil
Despite the large percentage of mobile shoppers among the respondents, a significant amount (69%) say they prefer to make online purchases with their computers. Of these, 43% prefer computers because they believe mobile is not safe and 32% prefer computers because websites are not mobile-responsive.

Security Factors that Favor M-Commerce in Brazil
Brazilian mobile users highlighted several factors that make them feel safer when shopping with their smartphones or tablets, such as:

  • Confidence in a website brand, application or application store (80%)
  • The accepted forms of payment (56%)
  • Safety terms published in the website or app (47%)
  • Comments of other users (39%)
  • Typing a personal password (37%)
  • Biometric recognition (20%)
  • Visual recognition by images (15%)
  • Voice recognition (12%)

Brazilian Views on Mobile Advertising
The respondents to the Pagtel survey indicated that they appreciate voicemail mobile ads the least (88% dislike them).

Other unpopular formats include banners in games (74% disapprove) and banners in apps (70% disapprove). Some other aspects of mobile campaigns that Brazilian users dislike include merchandising that the user did not authorize, uninteresting content and a high frequency of messages.

That said, respondents indicated mobile banners on websites do produce engagement, and 56% of respondents said they clicked on mobile banners.

Overall, Pagtel and Mobi.life’s study coincides with recent data we’ve seen from Ebit, which reported that m-commerce in Brazil produced sales of more than R$ 1.13 billion in the first half of 2014—a 102% increase. In fact, E-bit projects that mobile commerce will represent 10% of all e-commerce transactions done in Brazil in 2014.

As a company, we were aware of this rise in Brazilian m-commerce several years ago, and this is why we’ve recently premiered programmatic mobile ad buying on MediaDesk, the leading programmatic buying platform in Latin America. To find out more about how you can reach Brazilians with a highly targeted and efficient programmatic campaign, please contact us.

 

One thought on “M-commerce Takes Off in Brazil

  1. Pingback: Will M-commerce grow (and thrive) in Latin America? | The Emerging Markets Hub

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